About Sammy-B
Rank 769
1,198 followers Joined February 2018
Hi, I'm Beate, but many people call me Sammy. I don't really have a preference but people often find it easier to remember my nickname. In

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asked in
Authoring & Writing Content

When you start a new niche site, it is generally recommended that you publish posts regularly as this will increase your chances for a good ranking.

Now, not everyone c

This depends on whether or not you care about the keyword research over an extended period of time. Your keyword research will fluctuate over time. More competition will appear the longer you wait. So...That and how long you plan to have between starting the articles and actually launching the site.

I would lean toward not taking this approach, especially for SEO based sites. The sooner you get an article out there the sooner it can start to be tested by search engines for quality.

That and there is still some hint to the older a site gets the more basic authority and trust it has. So I would launch the site and just post slowly to it.

Unless you plan on taking a different approach like promoting the site through social and you feel you need a few dozen articles queued up before you want to start promoting. I did that with a resent site that wasn't geared toward SEO. I now have posts scheduled for the next 6 weeks (1 a week).

That's an interesting point, Craig. Do you think it's more beneficial to let your site and any keyword-based post you have written mature rather than concentrating on consistency? I just wonder how big the impact is when publishing inconsistently and whether this outweighs the benefits of getting everything out as soon as possible.

Many major players in the SEO space call consistency in publishing a myth. If you look at the published dates at a lot of articles that are #1 in Google they are from 5 or even 10 years ago.

Updating content to ensure it is relevant when people visit is key, but posting every week most considered a fallacy from what I've read.

Now don't read this the wrong way. Consistency does matter for certain niches and every article you post is another opportunity to strike a chord and rank near the top again...So there are certainly merits to consistent posting.

My understanding though is posting consistently does not provide any 'juice' toward moving your rankings up. That's just what I have found so far.

Thank you for this detailed insight, Craig. So in many cases, consistency doesn't play such a big role as long as the content is relevant to your audience.

That's very useful to know and will help with decisions as to the right approach.

Good luck moving forward! :)

I still do agree with the training here at WA though. Being consistent gives you more and more opportunities to rank. And that is just as important as anything else.

That being said, one high quality article a week is better than three pieces of garbage.

Thank you, Craig. That's great advice!

Hi Sammy,
I think there is absolutely no problem with this approach as far as your posts are unique and still relevant each time you publish.

Fantastic, thanks Enstine.

That sounds like a good idea, Beate.

Horses for course, I guess. Do what suits you best. I think however you do it will be the right way. So long as you write the articles.

Best wishes,
Paul

Thanks for your input, Paul. Yes, you still have to write the articles...

This sounds like a good idea. I'm not sure I could put this into practice, but it might help you launch faster.

I think if you know that this is the right approach, you can probably persuade yourself to hold back and not publish everything right away and at once but to phase it a bit. At least this is the theory, Haven.

I might give it a try on my next site, and see how it goes.

Will be interesting to see whether it makes a difference.

Ok after reading all the comment I want to add a point

Actually, According to me, Everything will depend on the owner of the website.
1. If you are a person who can post regularly (with an equal interval of time) on every website. Then you have to make the website first.
Now suppose If you create your 5 posts first and you invested your 10 days in it. It means your first post which was created on the very first or second day will not work for the next 8 or 9 days because you are creating your other post for your website.

and If your abilities or not like this then you can create some of the posts first. It will give you a great start.

In the end, everything will depend on your ability of creation. You have to decide according to your ability.

This is my general opinion here you are senior to me,

Thank you very much for reading my comment.

Yes, it's surely best to set up the website first if you can predict the amount of time available for your project. But if you can't predict this, you may have to adjust your approach, Brijaditya. The question is, what is the best approach. Might be a matter of trial and error.

If you want to be secure then make some post first

This will be a great Idea

It's worth a try...

Yes,

Sammy if this helps you. I usually write my ideas down and then put a draft title into my dashboard area so I know what I am going to write about.

That way at some stage I might have 1, 2 or maybe even 3 posts to publish at a time.

That's a good idea, Dave. I'm just sometimes worried that for some reason the system will crash and swallow up everything not published yet. Maybe I should trust technology a bit more...

it may also help you structure the site and menu layout

Good point, Steve. When you know what you are going to put onto your site you can implement the right structure and menu layout from the beginning.

that's what I'm thinking

Hi Beate,
I would get started right away. Publishing regularly will help you to rank faster in the eyes of Google.

However, even if you write a number of posts before you start, what happens when under no circumstance of your own, you are unable to write for a month or so when your website is up and running...

Just do what you can. Google loves consistency but life happens.

Wishing you success!

Yes, that's true, Jackie, life often gets in the way. So consistency cannot always be achieved.

I'm just starting...but I see your point. I think that when you map out your schedule it might be a good idea to pick a day to write say a weeks worth of post so you are good for at least that week...depending on how often you are going to post. I'm sure there are going to be days when content comes to me more readily than others so having a supply of info sure couldn't hurt could it?

This is what I was thinking, Susan, and to get a good supply before actually starting.

I think that's also a good idea but I refer to create a website first before writing posts.

Yes, that's the usual approach, Angie, and one I took in the past. I was just wondering whether this should be adjusted to fit circumstances.

See more comments

Is it a good idea to write posts before starting a site?

Is it a good idea to write posts before starting a site?

asked in
Authoring & Writing Content

When you start a new niche site, it is generally recommended that you publish posts regularly as this will increase your chances for a good ranking.

Now, not everyone c

This depends on whether or not you care about the keyword research over an extended period of time. Your keyword research will fluctuate over time. More competition will appear the longer you wait. So...That and how long you plan to have between starting the articles and actually launching the site.

I would lean toward not taking this approach, especially for SEO based sites. The sooner you get an article out there the sooner it can start to be tested by search engines for quality.

That and there is still some hint to the older a site gets the more basic authority and trust it has. So I would launch the site and just post slowly to it.

Unless you plan on taking a different approach like promoting the site through social and you feel you need a few dozen articles queued up before you want to start promoting. I did that with a resent site that wasn't geared toward SEO. I now have posts scheduled for the next 6 weeks (1 a week).

That's an interesting point, Craig. Do you think it's more beneficial to let your site and any keyword-based post you have written mature rather than concentrating on consistency? I just wonder how big the impact is when publishing inconsistently and whether this outweighs the benefits of getting everything out as soon as possible.

Many major players in the SEO space call consistency in publishing a myth. If you look at the published dates at a lot of articles that are #1 in Google they are from 5 or even 10 years ago.

Updating content to ensure it is relevant when people visit is key, but posting every week most considered a fallacy from what I've read.

Now don't read this the wrong way. Consistency does matter for certain niches and every article you post is another opportunity to strike a chord and rank near the top again...So there are certainly merits to consistent posting.

My understanding though is posting consistently does not provide any 'juice' toward moving your rankings up. That's just what I have found so far.

Thank you for this detailed insight, Craig. So in many cases, consistency doesn't play such a big role as long as the content is relevant to your audience.

That's very useful to know and will help with decisions as to the right approach.

Good luck moving forward! :)

I still do agree with the training here at WA though. Being consistent gives you more and more opportunities to rank. And that is just as important as anything else.

That being said, one high quality article a week is better than three pieces of garbage.

Thank you, Craig. That's great advice!

Hi Sammy,
I think there is absolutely no problem with this approach as far as your posts are unique and still relevant each time you publish.

Fantastic, thanks Enstine.

That sounds like a good idea, Beate.

Horses for course, I guess. Do what suits you best. I think however you do it will be the right way. So long as you write the articles.

Best wishes,
Paul

Thanks for your input, Paul. Yes, you still have to write the articles...

This sounds like a good idea. I'm not sure I could put this into practice, but it might help you launch faster.

I think if you know that this is the right approach, you can probably persuade yourself to hold back and not publish everything right away and at once but to phase it a bit. At least this is the theory, Haven.

I might give it a try on my next site, and see how it goes.

Will be interesting to see whether it makes a difference.

Ok after reading all the comment I want to add a point

Actually, According to me, Everything will depend on the owner of the website.
1. If you are a person who can post regularly (with an equal interval of time) on every website. Then you have to make the website first.
Now suppose If you create your 5 posts first and you invested your 10 days in it. It means your first post which was created on the very first or second day will not work for the next 8 or 9 days because you are creating your other post for your website.

and If your abilities or not like this then you can create some of the posts first. It will give you a great start.

In the end, everything will depend on your ability of creation. You have to decide according to your ability.

This is my general opinion here you are senior to me,

Thank you very much for reading my comment.

Yes, it's surely best to set up the website first if you can predict the amount of time available for your project. But if you can't predict this, you may have to adjust your approach, Brijaditya. The question is, what is the best approach. Might be a matter of trial and error.

If you want to be secure then make some post first

This will be a great Idea

It's worth a try...

Yes,

Sammy if this helps you. I usually write my ideas down and then put a draft title into my dashboard area so I know what I am going to write about.

That way at some stage I might have 1, 2 or maybe even 3 posts to publish at a time.

That's a good idea, Dave. I'm just sometimes worried that for some reason the system will crash and swallow up everything not published yet. Maybe I should trust technology a bit more...

it may also help you structure the site and menu layout

Good point, Steve. When you know what you are going to put onto your site you can implement the right structure and menu layout from the beginning.

that's what I'm thinking

Hi Beate,
I would get started right away. Publishing regularly will help you to rank faster in the eyes of Google.

However, even if you write a number of posts before you start, what happens when under no circumstance of your own, you are unable to write for a month or so when your website is up and running...

Just do what you can. Google loves consistency but life happens.

Wishing you success!

Yes, that's true, Jackie, life often gets in the way. So consistency cannot always be achieved.

I'm just starting...but I see your point. I think that when you map out your schedule it might be a good idea to pick a day to write say a weeks worth of post so you are good for at least that week...depending on how often you are going to post. I'm sure there are going to be days when content comes to me more readily than others so having a supply of info sure couldn't hurt could it?

This is what I was thinking, Susan, and to get a good supply before actually starting.

I think that's also a good idea but I refer to create a website first before writing posts.

Yes, that's the usual approach, Angie, and one I took in the past. I was just wondering whether this should be adjusted to fit circumstances.

See more comments

asked in
Keyword, Niche and Market Research

When you pick a micro niche for your website which only covers a small area of a topic, you won't be able to write as many posts on that limited subject area as if you picked a

It is hard but I think you still can. A micro niche has little competition. I read that what matters most is the quality of your post and consistent blogging. If you do only once a week posting every monday, be sure to do it consistently so that your readers will know when can they expect from you. I am sure Google can give you topics related to your micro niche.

Thanks Dan, that's very good advice.

The need of your target audience rules here Sammy!

Thanks for your input, Michael, I'll keep that in mind.

Yes you can Sammy, the more specific the niche, the better the targeting. Drill down and you may find a highly engaged fan base.

Remember, with over 3 Billion people on the internet, a micro-niche (or a very small sliver of that market to capture) can still be a huge audience.

Very good answer, Nice one Kaju

Perfect - but I can imagine that it will be harder to find your audience, or for your audience to find your site. Do you think that you would need to concentrate on social media campaigns even more, Kaju?

If you remember my previous question one week or so ago about using the keyword tool to find a very specific niche, this is exactly what this exercise was for.

Yes, I remember your question, Kaju. But I was wondering how you can continue to add posts to your blog when the subject area is quite limited. When you have a broader subject it's not so hard to find topics for 200+ articles, but with a micro niche that can prove quite tricky. As a result, your domain authority might not be high enough for your audience to find you, or do you think your site can still rank well?


I think you can find alot more relevant posting material for your micro-niche than you might expect Sammy.

Probably need to do some very thorough research, Kaju.

We all do!

Good answers Kaju, when writing is started, our minds start thiking outrside the box and then other subjects come into play.

I believe it can, because the authority comes from the knowledge you write on the blog for the niche and related topics off of it

Thanks for your answer, Dave. Do you think domain authority is down to the quality rather than the quantity of the posts on your site?

I would say a mix of both personally.Depends on how you write each post.

If you are carefully researching each post, then you can have both as opposed to just slinging one up as some do ( not some herre I might add, but others.

Thanks Dave. So you could be as successful with a micro niche as with a broader niche if the content is right.

As Kaju says and I agree with, absolutely.

See more comments

Can a micro niche site become an authority site?

Can a micro niche site become an authority site?

asked in
Keyword, Niche and Market Research

When you pick a micro niche for your website which only covers a small area of a topic, you won't be able to write as many posts on that limited subject area as if you picked a

It is hard but I think you still can. A micro niche has little competition. I read that what matters most is the quality of your post and consistent blogging. If you do only once a week posting every monday, be sure to do it consistently so that your readers will know when can they expect from you. I am sure Google can give you topics related to your micro niche.

Thanks Dan, that's very good advice.

The need of your target audience rules here Sammy!

Thanks for your input, Michael, I'll keep that in mind.

Yes you can Sammy, the more specific the niche, the better the targeting. Drill down and you may find a highly engaged fan base.

Remember, with over 3 Billion people on the internet, a micro-niche (or a very small sliver of that market to capture) can still be a huge audience.

Very good answer, Nice one Kaju

Perfect - but I can imagine that it will be harder to find your audience, or for your audience to find your site. Do you think that you would need to concentrate on social media campaigns even more, Kaju?

If you remember my previous question one week or so ago about using the keyword tool to find a very specific niche, this is exactly what this exercise was for.

Yes, I remember your question, Kaju. But I was wondering how you can continue to add posts to your blog when the subject area is quite limited. When you have a broader subject it's not so hard to find topics for 200+ articles, but with a micro niche that can prove quite tricky. As a result, your domain authority might not be high enough for your audience to find you, or do you think your site can still rank well?


I think you can find alot more relevant posting material for your micro-niche than you might expect Sammy.

Probably need to do some very thorough research, Kaju.

We all do!

Good answers Kaju, when writing is started, our minds start thiking outrside the box and then other subjects come into play.

I believe it can, because the authority comes from the knowledge you write on the blog for the niche and related topics off of it

Thanks for your answer, Dave. Do you think domain authority is down to the quality rather than the quantity of the posts on your site?

I would say a mix of both personally.Depends on how you write each post.

If you are carefully researching each post, then you can have both as opposed to just slinging one up as some do ( not some herre I might add, but others.

Thanks Dave. So you could be as successful with a micro niche as with a broader niche if the content is right.

As Kaju says and I agree with, absolutely.

See more comments

asked in
Keyword, Niche and Market Research

When looking for keywords, I sometimes get confusing results. For example, there are two keywords with similar average traffic, one has a QSR of 35 and an SEO of 100, the other

I haven't read all the answers here and I am sure many have answered your question, if you have a keyword with QSR 35 and SEO 100 and the other has a lower QSR (which is great) and an SEO of 99...I'd go for this one as it has less websites competing for your keyword.
In my personal experience QSR has more weight than SEO once you have passed the 81 mark (when it becomes great) - then go for lowest QSR and highest Average Traffic.
Good luck - Orion

Thanks Orion, that's great advice.

I knew this would create quite a conversation.

QSR means "quoted search results." If you have a keyword that comes back with QSR 8, that means only 8 articles exist on the entire internet with that exact keyword match. Which is very good. Don't get too confused with the SEO rating, that's not as important. The important numbers are average traffic (monthly searches) and QSR.

When starting out, try to aim for over 100 average and under 50 QSR. If you can't find a QSR for under 50, then shoot for under 100 and write a longer post (+2,500 words). I wouldn't suggest going under 300 because you'll have to be lucky to rank among 300 articles competing for the same KW.

Bless

Good answer

Thank you, Ade, that's a very clear answer with some good guide values to aim for.

I disagree with the other responses. I know they are following Kyle's training but you need monthly visitors to get sales. The less visitors the less potential for sales.

I go for the highest SEO and reasonable QSR and ESPECIALLY look at the possible monthly traffic. Regardless of the training if you can only get 15 or 20 visitors a month IF you are ranked on the first page it maybe low-hanging fruit but it's slim pickings in my opinion.

I try for an SEO of 80 or higher and the highest number of potential monthly visitors and look at QSR last. I know that's not the training but I want ranking with the highest possible number of monthly visitors.

If you count up all the possible monthly Traffic from the Jaxxy keyword search for your website you'll see what I mean. The more potential monthly traffic the better. Not saying compete with a keyword that has a QSR of 1,000 but I'll go higher than 100 and trust the quality of my content and work promoting the site to get higher rankings over time.

I know people will argue with me but do the math and see for yourself what makes sense.

Let the discussion begin!

That's very interesting, Steve, and sounds logical. My problem is that I don't understand how these figures fit together - if there is a lot of competition (and I don't make it to the first page) will I still get more traffic to my site than with hardly any competition and ranked in top position? Do you get a good amount of traffic with your approach? Maybe I should try both types of keywords, so also the ones with a higher QSR but a lot of traffic, and see what difference it makes.

I agree with your argument here...low QSR means low traffic.

A good combination of the right SEO and QSR is what I also go for.

Do you get good results this way? Have you also tried the low-hanging fruit keywords?

that's what I'm doing using both types of keywords and tracking the results. too soon to make any conclusions but I don't think logic gets suspended at Google's threshold.

I tried both. They both have their own value.

Actually, what I really focus on is giving quality content.

I try to have a good QSR and SEO in my title and that is it! I use Jaaxy when I try to find a good title and make sure to have it in AIOSEO meta title. I usually copy a few important lines from my article to the meta description, and that is it. That is my SEO.

I don't try to jam pack my article with keywords. I write what I want to say.

The important thing that we have to do when we are starting (my site is only about 10 weeks old so I'm still starting) is to write!

Write with meaning and write as often as you can. The more you write, the more Google will notice you, no matter what keyword you use.

I have been here for over 2 years but wasted a lot of time and my first niche is doing ok for the amount of time I have put in, but it's definitely not worth quitting my day job over.

I started with SWAG in January and even though I am not as far as I want to be, I did more in 10 weeks in my new niche than in 2 years in my previous niche.

What I have learned here is that it's not going to happen overnight and by itself! You have to take action and write to help your audience and it has to have quality.

I studied another WA member going from $10/month to over $1,000/month in about 18 months. But the blog has over 600,000 words and over 400 posts. And there are a lot of other examples within WA.

Bottom line is to be aware of SEO, but don't stress out over it. WRITE, and then write some more. You will get there by being persistent and taking action!

I want to make sure you understand that this is my opinion, and I am no expert.

Kyle, Carson, and Jay are the experts here. I also follow the advice of guys like Neil Patel, Gael Breton, Zac Johnson, Stewart Walker, Anik Signal, and a whole lot more.

I absolutely agree with you in the end it's about quality content.

That said, I read a lot of posts ranking high on page one of search results that are not very well written or very well informed so not too helpful. I don't know whether they make (a little or a lot of money) but they are not very good and yet they are ranked high.

Ranking on page one for certain keywords does not necessarily mean that they get their audience to convert and buy.

Plus, Google's algorithms and «new» guidelines are getting more and more sophisticated and rolling out almost daily.

I would not be surprised that in their case they would eventually lose their rank...That is what I have read on some other blog anyway.