About Grendall
Rank 217223
489 followers Joined November 2015
Although I've known about the existence of affiliate marketing for a while, I've never really taken it seriously. But lately, I've seen how affiliate marketing

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asked in
WA Affiliate Program

I normally get email from posts by other WA members. Since yesterday, all that stopped. I checked my account email notificaiton settinngs, and everything is checked.

Has

Featured Comment

Hi David,

We've checked our email sending logs to and your emails are being accepted by Gmail without any complaint. Mail servers always give us back receipts for emails we send and we can see in our logs that gmail is accepting the emails we're sending. As Kyle mentioned, check your junk, spam, or trash. You could also check your Promotions or Social tabs in Gmail. One more thing you could try is doing a search for "WealthyAffiliate.com". When you find the email, put it back into your INBOX. Gmail learns when you do this and will know to put messages from WA in your inbox from this point forward.

Carson

For whatever reason, without my having to do anything, I'm getting my WA emails once again. Thanks for all your responses!

I am not getting emails either. it has been for several days
so it is definitely on WA side

Have you check your spam in your email sometimes for whatever reason now and then they go there

That's weird. You might want to private message Kyle and Carson to see what's going on. Or try jumping in live chat to see if anyone else has experienced this.

I'm still getting all my emails.

The first thing you should do is check your spam box to make sure it is not going there. Sometimes an email client can all of a sudden switch email that you open regularly over to your spam, so that is what you should check.

We will also be looking into this from our end to see if there are any issues, I can see notifications are going out so this may be a one off issue, but do let us know either way David. Thanks.

See more comments

Why am I not getting emails of wa posts anymore?

Why am I not getting emails of wa posts anymore?

asked in
WA Affiliate Program

I normally get email from posts by other WA members. Since yesterday, all that stopped. I checked my account email notificaiton settinngs, and everything is checked.

Has

Featured Comment

Hi David,

We've checked our email sending logs to and your emails are being accepted by Gmail without any complaint. Mail servers always give us back receipts for emails we send and we can see in our logs that gmail is accepting the emails we're sending. As Kyle mentioned, check your junk, spam, or trash. You could also check your Promotions or Social tabs in Gmail. One more thing you could try is doing a search for "WealthyAffiliate.com". When you find the email, put it back into your INBOX. Gmail learns when you do this and will know to put messages from WA in your inbox from this point forward.

Carson

For whatever reason, without my having to do anything, I'm getting my WA emails once again. Thanks for all your responses!

I am not getting emails either. it has been for several days
so it is definitely on WA side

Have you check your spam in your email sometimes for whatever reason now and then they go there

That's weird. You might want to private message Kyle and Carson to see what's going on. Or try jumping in live chat to see if anyone else has experienced this.

I'm still getting all my emails.

The first thing you should do is check your spam box to make sure it is not going there. Sometimes an email client can all of a sudden switch email that you open regularly over to your spam, so that is what you should check.

We will also be looking into this from our end to see if there are any issues, I can see notifications are going out so this may be a one off issue, but do let us know either way David. Thanks.

See more comments

asked in
Search Engine Optimization

The FTC's (and Amazon's) requirement that the disclosure must be as close to the link as possible will require repetition of the affiliate disclosure statement near affiliate l

You could always have the disclosure on the side bar where it is quite visible, just needs to be where people can see it

KatieMac, I may have missed this. What disclosure do we need for Amazon? Thank you.

your really need an affiliate disclosure if you are promoting and sell other peoples products, it is not just for amazon, much the same way you have a privacy policy

KatieMac, are you an Amazon affiliate? And Amazon actually approved your affiliate application with your disclosure on the sidebar?

Yes, I am aware that the requisite affiliate disclosure is an FTC requirement, and hence, applies to all affiliate marketing. The reason why I specified Amazon was because they, like the FTC, actually explicitly mandates a clearly visible affiliate disclosure, and I was wondering how you guys do it and was still able to get Amazon's approval.

Are you an Amazon affiliate, and your site got approved with your affiliate disclosure at the sidebar?

yes I am an amazon affiliate

KatieMac, is the Disclosure a statement saying I am an Amazon Affiliate? I may have missed this from Amazon. I would appreciate if you can explain what my Disclosure should be concerning. Thanks, again, Katie.

This should help you understand it

I agree with BarryJ. I have mine, same thing.

BarryJ, are you an Amazon affiliate? And Amazon approved your site the way it is?

I put the disclosure statement on the footer menu only. I understand that it's only required to be available for the customer to see if he/she wants to.

Are you an Amazon affiliate? And if so, Amazon actually approved your placement of your disclosure statement at the footer? Because I could've sworn I read a post from a WA member who said Amazon disapproved her site because her disclosure was at the footer.

I am an Amazon affiliate and have not heard any negative comments from amazon yet. If they tell me it's wrong, then I'll change it.
Barry

BarryJ, I'd like to clarify. When Amazon approved your site, did you already have your disclosure statement at the footer? And you are saying that your disclosure was at your footer ONLY and nowhere else when Amazon approved it?

Also, another WA member said Amazon will only look at your site for approval only after your first sale. Is that still the way Amazon does it?

Thanks.

See more comments

Will google penalize repetitive disclosure text?

Will google penalize repetitive disclosure text?

asked in
Search Engine Optimization

The FTC's (and Amazon's) requirement that the disclosure must be as close to the link as possible will require repetition of the affiliate disclosure statement near affiliate l

You could always have the disclosure on the side bar where it is quite visible, just needs to be where people can see it

KatieMac, I may have missed this. What disclosure do we need for Amazon? Thank you.

your really need an affiliate disclosure if you are promoting and sell other peoples products, it is not just for amazon, much the same way you have a privacy policy

KatieMac, are you an Amazon affiliate? And Amazon actually approved your affiliate application with your disclosure on the sidebar?

Yes, I am aware that the requisite affiliate disclosure is an FTC requirement, and hence, applies to all affiliate marketing. The reason why I specified Amazon was because they, like the FTC, actually explicitly mandates a clearly visible affiliate disclosure, and I was wondering how you guys do it and was still able to get Amazon's approval.

Are you an Amazon affiliate, and your site got approved with your affiliate disclosure at the sidebar?

yes I am an amazon affiliate

KatieMac, is the Disclosure a statement saying I am an Amazon Affiliate? I may have missed this from Amazon. I would appreciate if you can explain what my Disclosure should be concerning. Thanks, again, Katie.

This should help you understand it

I agree with BarryJ. I have mine, same thing.

BarryJ, are you an Amazon affiliate? And Amazon approved your site the way it is?

I put the disclosure statement on the footer menu only. I understand that it's only required to be available for the customer to see if he/she wants to.

Are you an Amazon affiliate? And if so, Amazon actually approved your placement of your disclosure statement at the footer? Because I could've sworn I read a post from a WA member who said Amazon disapproved her site because her disclosure was at the footer.

I am an Amazon affiliate and have not heard any negative comments from amazon yet. If they tell me it's wrong, then I'll change it.
Barry

BarryJ, I'd like to clarify. When Amazon approved your site, did you already have your disclosure statement at the footer? And you are saying that your disclosure was at your footer ONLY and nowhere else when Amazon approved it?

Also, another WA member said Amazon will only look at your site for approval only after your first sale. Is that still the way Amazon does it?

Thanks.

See more comments

asked in
Getting Started

As you all probably have heard many times, affiliate marketing is your own business.

Does anyone know if obtaining a business license for your affiliate marketing busine

A massive question, it probably dependes on where you reside in the global community, and where you are predominantly trying to sell. Haven't got a license but have registered with the IRS as a non resident for the purposes of taxation. Something we should bear in mind. The one tenant that all tax durisdictions hold in commen is that ignorance is no defence.

Actually, unless things have changed, I can simply use my social security number as my business tax ID and would not have to register a business. The IRS doesn't care about business licenses, they care about me paying my taxes. So as long as I report my income, they couldn't care less about anything else.

I just wanted to get a feel for how many of you guys actually acquire a business license.

I'm in Canada. Yes, got one just in case, cheers!

I guess it's different in different countries. The only reason I can see if there is a tax advantage.

One more reason I love in Thailand. I'll still have to pay US income tax on any money though.

Here in Canada, an occupation is classified as a hobby until you start to make money. Then it's a business and you need a business licence.

We are not subject to federal law but a similar thing applies. Actually the Uk tax man is very good, he won't chase you until you earn money. Then it's a good idea to become legit.
Bob

The moment you really earn some money, you have to get a business license, it is not something you choose for...

Grtz,
Bert

See more comments

Did any of you actually get a business license?

Did any of you actually get a business license?

asked in
Getting Started

As you all probably have heard many times, affiliate marketing is your own business.

Does anyone know if obtaining a business license for your affiliate marketing busine

A massive question, it probably dependes on where you reside in the global community, and where you are predominantly trying to sell. Haven't got a license but have registered with the IRS as a non resident for the purposes of taxation. Something we should bear in mind. The one tenant that all tax durisdictions hold in commen is that ignorance is no defence.

Actually, unless things have changed, I can simply use my social security number as my business tax ID and would not have to register a business. The IRS doesn't care about business licenses, they care about me paying my taxes. So as long as I report my income, they couldn't care less about anything else.

I just wanted to get a feel for how many of you guys actually acquire a business license.

I'm in Canada. Yes, got one just in case, cheers!

I guess it's different in different countries. The only reason I can see if there is a tax advantage.

One more reason I love in Thailand. I'll still have to pay US income tax on any money though.

Here in Canada, an occupation is classified as a hobby until you start to make money. Then it's a business and you need a business licence.

We are not subject to federal law but a similar thing applies. Actually the Uk tax man is very good, he won't chase you until you earn money. Then it's a good idea to become legit.
Bob

The moment you really earn some money, you have to get a business license, it is not something you choose for...

Grtz,
Bert

See more comments

asked in
Authoring & Writing Content

I remember reading about this a long time ago, and I just read it again. Is it true that, by law, that affiliate marketers must notify the user that clicking on your affiliate

Yes, everyone has given good advice. You can google affiliate disclaimer or just look on competitor's sites to get good examples of how they are written and where you need to place them on your site. There is also training here at WA on what needs to go on the site. Dave.

You must, according to the law, and in a way that they'll know before seeing the link, not hidden somewhere on the bottom left corner. An affiliate disclosure in the top menu is also fine - - add some words saying that I only recommend products that I think are good, that it helps support this website, etc, it will make it sound better. Good Luck!

Yes, per FTC regulation you have to display an Affiliate Disclaimer. Amazon requires specifically that visitors to your site are informed that you are an affiliate, receiving commissions.

John

Thanks John for clearing this up. DAN

Everyone. This is the definitive statement regarding disclosure of an affiliate marketing situations. Please understand that the heart of the GUIDE is fraudulent misrepresentation. Thank being said, here is the URL:https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/ftcs-endorsement-guides-what-people-are-asking

If you have, for example, looked at the product or reviewed a product and you have a pay widget you COULD get into trouble if the only reason you were endorsing the product was a sham (fraulent misrepresentation just to make the sale).

The world is replete with Rules and Regulations. Please read the now popular book "A Felony A Day" which explains that if you look at it from a regulators point of view you are more than likely committing at least one Felony a Day. There is more to life than being regulated. Simply stated, don't misrepresent anything in your blogs (that's fraud) and carry on. DAN

In my case, I have a widget entry that explains briefly the rationale for the commission, and I explain more in detail in the legal page....Covers me and also is transparent then to the prospect....

Regardless of your explanation, if the buyer THINKS that you have fraudulently misrepresented the product you could be liable for FTC sanctions. Just do a good job of properly representing the product on you blog and you will be all right. DAN

Good question and some good answers I think. You could always ask a distant friend to ring up the authorities with that question, it would be really interesting to see what they say.

Bob

The Feds aren't going to be knocking on your door. But, say you're using Amazon & don't have an affiliate disclaimer, then they could withold your commission. Which is far more likely to happen.

How does one have to present the affiliate disclaimer in order for Amazon to be satisfied? Can you tell us in a nutshell?

Read Section 10. In https://affiliate-program.amazon.com/gp/associates/agreement/

I would. It see s problem as how do you check the billions !!!

Grendall: The internet, legally, is still the Wild West. It is difficult if not impossible to legislate the internet except through the Federal Government and they would just screw it up. No worries. As long as your "clickers" are not being defrauded some way (and I can't think of a way you could do that short of fraud) you are on pretty solid ground not doing anything similar to what you asked about. DAN

Back in 2009, it was just a "rumor" of what's to come. I got out of affiliate marketing shortly after that and never knew if such a law did come into being.

So are you confirming that there is indeed such a law in effect now? That's really what I needed to know. Thanks.

Grendall: I am not aware of any such law. The Feds can do a lot of screwy things but they have tended to stay away from things "internet". Why? Just think about enforcement. Is your website hosted in the U.S.? No. Are you a U.S. citizen? I don't know but many WAers are not. Are you selling anything? No Amazon or whoever you are affiliating with is doing the selling. Are you guaranteeing anything. No the "cliker" knows that they must go back to the "clickee" if they have any problems. Are you using the mail service? No Amazon is mailing it or some public carrier company like FedEx. Are you selling anything that is illegal to sell? I hope not. The point is, when the Feds step in to control any aspect of the internet they will start with the obvious...taxing the daylights out of those that use the internet. Until then they are more than happy to leave it alone.

Now I am not providing you with a legal opinion because I am not licensed in your state. which is another problem even for the Feds as they have to use your jurisdiction to bring suit. You can always check but not many attorneys know beans about the internet. It truly is, still today, the Wild West of the Internet. DAN

Yes there is.....Please have a look here at these sites for more...

(1) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Millennium_Copyright_Act
(2) https://www.ftc.gov/search/site/affiliate disclaimer

It is called the DMCA by most, but these two sites explain in detail what is involved...

As others have said, likely you would not run into problems NOT disclosing that you are an affiliate, but to cover yourself, I would put in a prominent place on your site, it is the moral thing to do...

There is nothing wroong with making money from a referral, it is done all the time in offline business. A lot of my business involves commissions for service or products rendered...

Cheers!
Dave : )

Thank you for clearing this up. I stand corrected. I will not be giving the notice on my blog as it is no ones business but my own. Thanks again. DAN

I have looked at both sets of info you have provided (cursorly) and I guess I don't see what you are referring to. Could you be more specific with the rule or text of the law? DAN

I don't know if it's a law but I believe when you're leading people to buy something, it's best to be upfront and let them know somewhere on your site that you get paid for referring good products.

Hi, it is encouraged to have a separate page of disclosure policy that you are making money by joining affiliate programs. Additionally it is a good idea to mention inside the post that it has some affiliate links.

Thing is, I've reviewed about three to four sites since I joined WA, and I don't recall anyone disclosing anything. I know I heard about this possible/potential law back in 2009, but what I wanted to know is if such a disclosure law is indeed now in effect. Do you know?

Yes everyone is required to do so by law.

Copy and paste from the FTC website in question and answer form:

"I’m an affiliate marketer with links to an online retailer on my website. When people read what I’ve written about a particular product and then click on those links and buy something from the retailer, I earn a commission from the retailer. What do I have to disclose? Where should the disclosure be?"


"If you disclose your relationship to the retailer clearly and conspicuously on your site, readers can decide how much weight to give your endorsement.

In some instances – like when the affiliate link is embedded in your product review – a single disclosure may be adequate. When the review has a clear and conspicuous disclosure of your relationship and the reader can see both the review containing that disclosure and the link at the same time, readers have the information they need. You could say something like, “I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.” But if the product review containing the disclosure and the link are separated, readers may lose the connection.

As for where to place a disclosure, the guiding principle is that it has to be clear and conspicuous. The closer it is to your recommendation, the better. Putting disclosures in obscure places – for example, buried on an ABOUT US or GENERAL INFO page, behind a poorly labeled hyperlink or in a “terms of service” agreement – isn’t good enough. Neither is placing it below your review or below the link to the online retailer so readers would have to keep scrolling after they finish reading. Consumers should be able to notice the disclosure easily. They shouldn’t have to hunt for it."

Hmm... so it is law now. I've read through several sites since I joined WA, and I never saw any such disclosure, that's why I didn't even remember that I heard this back in 2009, until I read about it just a few minutes ago.

Thanks for confirming.

No problem. I don't see it on a lot of websites either, but whenever I check someone's site I do let them know so they can try to stay out of trouble.

I think this is important to mention: https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/ftcs-endorsement-guides-what-people-are-asking#about

I find this particular question in the FAQ interesting: "I’m a blogger. I heard that every time I mention a product on my blog, I have to say whether I got it for free or paid for it myself. Is that true?
Answer: No. If you mention a product you paid for yourself, there isn’t an issue. Nor is it an issue if you get the product for free because a store is giving out free samples to its customers.

The FTC is only concerned about endorsements that are made on behalf of a sponsoring advertiser. For example, an endorsement would be covered by the FTC Act if an advertiser – or someone working for an advertiser – pays you or gives you something of value to mention a product. If you receive free products or other perks with the expectation that you’ll promote or discuss the advertiser’s products in your blog, you’re covered. Bloggers who are part of network marketing programs where they sign up to receive free product samples in exchange for writing about them also are covered."

What I'm getting from this is that if you yourself have paid for the product or have used the product (out of someone's generosity of having given it to you), you don't have to disclose anything. The FTC is only after those who neither have used nor paid for the product and is out there marketing it. Do you see it the same way?

See more comments

Does everyone inform users that you are making a commission?

Does everyone inform users that you are making a commission?

asked in
Authoring & Writing Content

I remember reading about this a long time ago, and I just read it again. Is it true that, by law, that affiliate marketers must notify the user that clicking on your affiliate

Yes, everyone has given good advice. You can google affiliate disclaimer or just look on competitor's sites to get good examples of how they are written and where you need to place them on your site. There is also training here at WA on what needs to go on the site. Dave.

You must, according to the law, and in a way that they'll know before seeing the link, not hidden somewhere on the bottom left corner. An affiliate disclosure in the top menu is also fine - - add some words saying that I only recommend products that I think are good, that it helps support this website, etc, it will make it sound better. Good Luck!

Yes, per FTC regulation you have to display an Affiliate Disclaimer. Amazon requires specifically that visitors to your site are informed that you are an affiliate, receiving commissions.

John

Thanks John for clearing this up. DAN

Everyone. This is the definitive statement regarding disclosure of an affiliate marketing situations. Please understand that the heart of the GUIDE is fraudulent misrepresentation. Thank being said, here is the URL:https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/ftcs-endorsement-guides-what-people-are-asking

If you have, for example, looked at the product or reviewed a product and you have a pay widget you COULD get into trouble if the only reason you were endorsing the product was a sham (fraulent misrepresentation just to make the sale).

The world is replete with Rules and Regulations. Please read the now popular book "A Felony A Day" which explains that if you look at it from a regulators point of view you are more than likely committing at least one Felony a Day. There is more to life than being regulated. Simply stated, don't misrepresent anything in your blogs (that's fraud) and carry on. DAN

In my case, I have a widget entry that explains briefly the rationale for the commission, and I explain more in detail in the legal page....Covers me and also is transparent then to the prospect....

Regardless of your explanation, if the buyer THINKS that you have fraudulently misrepresented the product you could be liable for FTC sanctions. Just do a good job of properly representing the product on you blog and you will be all right. DAN

Good question and some good answers I think. You could always ask a distant friend to ring up the authorities with that question, it would be really interesting to see what they say.

Bob

The Feds aren't going to be knocking on your door. But, say you're using Amazon & don't have an affiliate disclaimer, then they could withold your commission. Which is far more likely to happen.

How does one have to present the affiliate disclaimer in order for Amazon to be satisfied? Can you tell us in a nutshell?

Read Section 10. In https://affiliate-program.amazon.com/gp/associates/agreement/

I would. It see s problem as how do you check the billions !!!

Grendall: The internet, legally, is still the Wild West. It is difficult if not impossible to legislate the internet except through the Federal Government and they would just screw it up. No worries. As long as your "clickers" are not being defrauded some way (and I can't think of a way you could do that short of fraud) you are on pretty solid ground not doing anything similar to what you asked about. DAN

Back in 2009, it was just a "rumor" of what's to come. I got out of affiliate marketing shortly after that and never knew if such a law did come into being.

So are you confirming that there is indeed such a law in effect now? That's really what I needed to know. Thanks.

Grendall: I am not aware of any such law. The Feds can do a lot of screwy things but they have tended to stay away from things "internet". Why? Just think about enforcement. Is your website hosted in the U.S.? No. Are you a U.S. citizen? I don't know but many WAers are not. Are you selling anything? No Amazon or whoever you are affiliating with is doing the selling. Are you guaranteeing anything. No the "cliker" knows that they must go back to the "clickee" if they have any problems. Are you using the mail service? No Amazon is mailing it or some public carrier company like FedEx. Are you selling anything that is illegal to sell? I hope not. The point is, when the Feds step in to control any aspect of the internet they will start with the obvious...taxing the daylights out of those that use the internet. Until then they are more than happy to leave it alone.

Now I am not providing you with a legal opinion because I am not licensed in your state. which is another problem even for the Feds as they have to use your jurisdiction to bring suit. You can always check but not many attorneys know beans about the internet. It truly is, still today, the Wild West of the Internet. DAN

Yes there is.....Please have a look here at these sites for more...

(1) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Millennium_Copyright_Act
(2) https://www.ftc.gov/search/site/affiliate disclaimer

It is called the DMCA by most, but these two sites explain in detail what is involved...

As others have said, likely you would not run into problems NOT disclosing that you are an affiliate, but to cover yourself, I would put in a prominent place on your site, it is the moral thing to do...

There is nothing wroong with making money from a referral, it is done all the time in offline business. A lot of my business involves commissions for service or products rendered...

Cheers!
Dave : )

Thank you for clearing this up. I stand corrected. I will not be giving the notice on my blog as it is no ones business but my own. Thanks again. DAN

I have looked at both sets of info you have provided (cursorly) and I guess I don't see what you are referring to. Could you be more specific with the rule or text of the law? DAN

I don't know if it's a law but I believe when you're leading people to buy something, it's best to be upfront and let them know somewhere on your site that you get paid for referring good products.

Hi, it is encouraged to have a separate page of disclosure policy that you are making money by joining affiliate programs. Additionally it is a good idea to mention inside the post that it has some affiliate links.

Thing is, I've reviewed about three to four sites since I joined WA, and I don't recall anyone disclosing anything. I know I heard about this possible/potential law back in 2009, but what I wanted to know is if such a disclosure law is indeed now in effect. Do you know?

Yes everyone is required to do so by law.

Copy and paste from the FTC website in question and answer form:

"I’m an affiliate marketer with links to an online retailer on my website. When people read what I’ve written about a particular product and then click on those links and buy something from the retailer, I earn a commission from the retailer. What do I have to disclose? Where should the disclosure be?"


"If you disclose your relationship to the retailer clearly and conspicuously on your site, readers can decide how much weight to give your endorsement.

In some instances – like when the affiliate link is embedded in your product review – a single disclosure may be adequate. When the review has a clear and conspicuous disclosure of your relationship and the reader can see both the review containing that disclosure and the link at the same time, readers have the information they need. You could say something like, “I get commissions for purchases made through links in this post.” But if the product review containing the disclosure and the link are separated, readers may lose the connection.

As for where to place a disclosure, the guiding principle is that it has to be clear and conspicuous. The closer it is to your recommendation, the better. Putting disclosures in obscure places – for example, buried on an ABOUT US or GENERAL INFO page, behind a poorly labeled hyperlink or in a “terms of service” agreement – isn’t good enough. Neither is placing it below your review or below the link to the online retailer so readers would have to keep scrolling after they finish reading. Consumers should be able to notice the disclosure easily. They shouldn’t have to hunt for it."