What was the last purchase you made? Let's take a minute and look at the last purchase that you made online...

  • Where did you start and where did you end up?
  • Did you purchase the same day that you started looking, and why or why not?
  • Were you exposed to positive or negative advertising about a product?
  • Did you see the product/service in a magazine or on TV before you saw it online?
  • Was the price an issue for you, why or why not?
  • What was the last phase in the analysis process before you actually purchased the product?
  • Did you go on Facebook or Twitter for some purchasing guidance?
There are many things that you can learn from taking a look at how you purchase something online. You probably follow many of the steps that your visitors take when purchasing. You will find that you may research things slightly differently from others in the early stages, however the last few steps in the process before you make the purchase, will probably reflect that of all customers.

By reverse engineering your own customer activity, you will get a lot of insight as to how people become customers. This personal dissection exercise is good practice and is something that you can do if you are having a tough time converting. Walk through a "fake" transaction from the very initial research phase all the way to the action phase and you will be surprised as to how much insight this actually gives you.

YOU are a customer, leverage that!


Join the Discussion
Write something…
Recent messages
gelcita Premium
Thanks, Kyle for this very informative and well to guide those who are in this business as well as those newbies like me. This will serve as a guide to us on how to engage a prospective customer and let them trust us and finally will become our buying customer.
Reply
Kyle Premium Plus
For sure, understanding your audience, your buyers, and the emotions that trigger someone to actually buy are critical within any industry.
Reply
NolanB Premium
Kyle, so basically what you are saying is that we should incorporate the key word phrases and the product name were promoting all in our content.So if i came up with let's say 30 good key words and phrases would it be good if i could put them all in my content and have my content in some kind of review form that way google can pick out the keyword phrases and move me up the rankings and my perspective customer can find my site easier.
Reply
DianeScorpio Premium
Hi - you should use just one keyword for each post you write. You include it in the title, once in the first paragraph, then maybe once or twice throughout the post if it looks natural. If you add it more than that, then Google sees it as keyword stuffing, and will actually place you lower in its rankings.
Reply
NolanB Premium
Thanks for the reply, OK I've done my key word research and I've
come up with about 22 good keywords that are in good range on the keyword research tool so basically I should use just one keyword at a time and write content on each one of those keywords and once I've exhausted those keywords, mine some more and repeat the process?
Reply
DianeScorpio Premium
Exactly!
Reply
sfullwood71 Premium Plus
Correct!
Reply
NolanB Premium
Thank you for the feedback
Reply
NolanB Premium
Thank you for the feed back
Reply
ExpatMark Premium
People who have never been in sales and are new to WA need to read this until they can recite it. Great information and those of us who have been is sales should really pounce on the fourth part of the Life Cycle because long-term clients are gonna bring you gold. That gold is referrals!
Reply
CassiOfTroy Premium Plus
I agree with you, Mark.
Excellent! information.

Cassi
Reply
RCM365 Premium
Yeah, this really is an excellent read, I have made several notes on the whiteboard above my desk.

Please forgive what is likely a silly question that will be answered in the next lesson - but it seems to be implied here that I should already have affiliate links at this point. Right? Because what's the point of having a bunch of traffic from people at the purchase phase if I have nothing to sell them?

I do have a small, not likely to be super lucrative, affiliate link - and I'm glad to have it. But I guess I have the chicken or the egg question - do I write content for traffic before getting affiliate program agreement; or do I try to get affiliate program agreement and then market my content to that? I'm pretty sure it's the former since many programs probably aren't that interested in forming a partnership until they know your site has worthy content.

Sorry folks - at this point I'm not even sure what I'm asking anymore. 🤔 I'm going on to the next lesson and I'm sure I will get closer to my answer - I usually do!

Thanks
Reply
Labman Premium Plus
Traffic first. Write some content without links and start to build an audience. Links will be addressed at the right time.
Reply
RCM365 Premium
Thanks Labman, that makes sense.
Reply
1Rudy1 Premium
Yes, I agree, well stated with some great tips on what to do when considering your customers.
In web design classes, when creating the website there were two reference points, UX and UI. To stay on point, UX refers to the user and how they relate to the company, it's services and products offered.
I find by looking at my website as a consumer/customer, I am able to smooth out areas that may not be clearly stated or illustrated. That helps me to stay on point when creating new pages or adding new products.
Reply
Top