Customer comprehension is a variant that is tricky to deal with. How do you teach someone that "thinks" they know exactly who their customer is, but they are completely off base?

You have to follow certain metrics that prove that you understand exactly who your customer is. These are the determining factors at it comes down to how well you know your niche. Your answer should be YES to the following questions:

(1) Do you read regularly about your niche?
(2) Can you effectively communicate with others in your niche?
(3) Do you comprehend customers issues?
(4) Can you come up with your own "pros and cons" for each customer situation (product, service, etc)?
(5) Do you understand the core problems within your niche?

You should comprehend all of these, if you don't, then you need to spend some time in the trenches learning about your niche and the customer idiosyncrasies. Let's look at an example.

If you were selling golf clubs..

If you are trying to sell golf clubs online, where would you start? What keywords would you try to target?

If you were to deliver traffic coming from general keywords like "golf" or even a keyword phrase like "golf clubs", chances are you would have a low conversion rate. The reason that "golf clubs" won't convert is because you're picking up this visitor too early in the purchasing life cycle.

At this point, they are typically looking for information about golf clubs, and you cannot make an assumption as to what they are looking for. Perhaps they want to see what a golf club looks like so they can draw it...who knows. Chances are at this point they are not ready to buy, and will usually perform several more searches before they do decide to make a purchasing decision..

Let's drill down a little more and catch someone a little further along in the purchasing lifecycle. We now know that "golf" & "golf clubs" won't convert very high. After visiting a few forums, you can easily discover that people are searching for irons, putters, drivers, wedges, or specialize clubs. So, chances are that the keyword "golf clubs" (although seemingly targeted) is actually way too broad.

If you start promoting here, it will take a lot more work to actually sell than if you were to dig a little deeper into the purchasing lifecycle.

Drivers, wedges, irons, and putters are still too broad and people will want to learn about brand names, types, loft, and reviews before they make a purchase. That is where you can capture people at the "decision phase".

Ideally, you would hyper-target someone who types in Taylor Made r5 Driver, or someone who is searching for a 56 degree Cleveland Gap Wedge. People that are searching these terms are very far along in the lifecycle and it will take far less effort than someone that is searching for "golf clubs" to convert them into buyers.

And the ultimate search terms, the ones where the person is in the "action phase" would be terms like:

  • where do I buy Taylor Made r5 Driver
  • best deal on Taylor Made r5 Driver
  • buy Taylor Made r5 Driver online
  • Taylor Made r5 Driver ebay
  • purchase Taylor Made r5 Driver
Again, it is much more work to walk someone through all the stages of the life-cycle, and typically requires several follow-ups or points of contact, but there is a much larger audience. The key is to understand who your customer is and understand what they are really looking for (ex. understanding all the types of golf clubs if you are promoting golf clubs).


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KimAbuschin1 Premium
Great information. I learned about this customer or audience concept in college and after using it in my IT Career, the feedback I got was amazing. I also found it helpful as a Mom of 3 children, who are now grown. Understanding the audience is critical to meeting them where they are and not wasting their time and this is true regardless of what industry you are in or what you are trying to sell them.
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RHayduk1954 Premium
These 7 pages - wow. All laid out start to finish with minimal wordage. Very clear - thanks!

One of my main purchasing procedures, probably belongs in this last, long-term customer category: I have something I liked, it broke after years of faithful service, and now I need to replace it.

Makes me think.

Thanks again
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Kyle Premium Plus
Awesome, glad this offered clarity. When I create content, I try to avoid bloat or fluff (stuff that doesn't need to be there). :)
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Natalia777 Premium
Very informative, this training gave me a much better understanding of the process.

I have a question though, for new brand websites, is that ok to use keywords that are for the second (Decision) and third (Purchase) phase ?

Or firstly, there should be written some posts targeting people in the first page (Research) in order to offer information and gain trust (does it have to take a couple of months?), and only after that, write posts targeting people that are in the second and third phase ?
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JohnCrossley Premium
You want to include posts that target all stages. If you only included the early stages, they may like what you have said and decide to buy it, but they will buy it elsewhere.

The other factor to consider is most of our website visitors will only be on your website once. So that is why you need to target them all.
They may read your (research post), and follow your link through to your review (purchase stage) and buy it then and there.

A good mixture of posts is best. hope that makes sense?

John
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littlemama Premium Plus
Hi Natalia,

I'll PM you my keyword advice :)

Grace
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Nelcea1 Premium
Just to see if I am on the right tract.
This was my actual purchase a few days ago.

I saw something I liked and wanted a pair so I ask the person where they got them from. With that information of the website I went there and figure , hey I could get this cheaper on eBay.

So I went there and searched
first prices
then colors
then colors and sizes
and shipping

This is what I do every time right before I purchase scroll down to the reviews on product and the seller.

Once I was satisfied with a seller I purchased.

I think I got it! The customer purchase life cycle!

I wrote it down because I tend to forget sometimes.
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Guayacan Premium
I remember once I was selling led light bulbs, solar panels and similar products. Other employees asked me how do you make so many sales? I have always liked to help others so I explained that When I started at the company I asked myself, What would be the best way to approach people to win there attention and convince them to buy. Suddenly I saw that a person that I wanted to offer my product had an electric bill on top of the table. I decided to tell him I see that you received your electric bill? I can only think how high it must be. This gave me the best approach to make the sale. Sometimes selecting the proper words can help you more than you think.
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