KGR Keywords - A Slight Twist On Jaaxy's Method

Last Update: July 09, 2018

Over the past year or so, I've been talking a lot on my blog (not my WA one in case you go looking for it) about KGR keywords, or "Keyword Golden Ratio" keywords. I also interviewed Doug Cunnington a couple of times on my podcast, and he's the one who introduced it to us.

Since then, a lot of my customers and audience members have had some success with KGR keywords, and I have also with my own sites.

Before I go into details on how KGR keywords work and how they're different from the Jaaxy method, I wanted to point out that they are acutally very similar to what K+C teach, there's just a slight twist that makes them even more precise.

Both methods are considered "Old school" within the keyword industry these days, but that's a good thing, because you can find a ton of keywords others are ignoring.

If I had a batch of say, 10 articles to my website, all of which are KGR compliant, then I can usually expect something like this:

  1. 2-3 articles will hit page 1 within a week or two.
  2. 3-5 articles will hit page 1 later on.
  3. The rest may reach page 1 or may not. It depends on how strong the site is, how long I've been adding articles for, and things like that.

This is a pretty good ratio. Other keyword research methods might not be as accurate, so I wanted to share it all with you.

I also want to point out that this is a method for finding LONG TAIL keywords only. And by that, I'm not talking about the length of the keyword, but the fact it only has 250 or fewer searches. (Remember my post about long-tail keywords where I point that the the "long tail" refers to the popularity of the keyword, not the length).

So, What Are KGR Keywords?

The Keyword Golden Ratio is this:

  1. Only applies to keywords with 250 searches or less. (When the volume is higher, it's easier to get the golden ratio even in competitive keywords, so it doesn't work).
  2. Find the "allintitle: keyword" number for the keyword. (Will show examples below)
  3. Divide the allintitle number by the search volume. If this leaves a score of 0.25 or lower, then you've found a golden ratio. Typically these keywords are much easier to rank for.

So for example...let's say you find a keyword and it has 100 searches. You go to google.com and type "allintitle: whatever your keyword is here" (you can do it with or without quotes)

Google will show something like "showing 1 to 10 of 58 results".

So, you know the allintitle number is 58.

Now you take 58 and divide it by 100 (the search volume for this keyword). You get a score of 0.58 which is not bad, but is not a KGR keyword. Usually I will accept anything between 0.25-0.5 even though 0.25 and below is better.

Hold On - Isn't This The Same As How Jaaxy Works?

No, it's a very similar process, but with one detail different.

"Allintitle" searches for websites that have the keywords in the title in any order. They could also have other words in the title as well.

Jaaxy uses "QSR" which is Quoted Search Results. This means they only find websites where the keyword is in the title EXACTLY as you've searched for it.

"Allintitle" is better, because it's much harder to find keywords where fewer sites have the keyword in the title in any order, so therefore, when you find these ones, that means there is less competition.

Here's an example:

Maybe your keyword is "how to make money online".

Using Jaaxy and QSR, you get a result of around 300, because according to Google, only 300 websites have that exact keyword.

Using KGR though, you get a result of 191,000 results.

This means that only 300 sites have "how to make money online" as their exact title, but nearly 200,000 sites have those words somewhere in the title.

Now, in 2018, Google doesn't rank websites based on whether they exactly match the keyword anymore. Look at page 1 in Google and you'll see that none of the top 10 actually have "how to make money online" as their exact title.

So when you use Jaaxy and target something that has a low QSR, it doesn't necessarily mean you're going to rank, because there could be a ton of different ways of writing that keyword or there could be a bunch of websites that don't have the exact keyword, but they have those words in a different order.

But with KGR keywords, it's much harder to find ones where only a few sites have keywords anywhere in the title.

So that means when you DO find a keyword that has a low KGR score, it means this:

- Not only are there very few sites with the exact title (low QSR)
- There are also very few sites that have those keywords AT ALL.

So that just means the keyword is even less competitive than using QSR.

I hope this logic makes sense. It took me a while to get my head around when I first started looking for KGR keywords, but it totally makes sense to me now, and the results I get have demonstrated this.

So what I'm saying is, if you don't quite get the point or the difference, let me know in the comments and I'll try to clarify more.

How To Research These Keywords

So, you can still use Jaaxy to generate lists of keywords, to get ideas, and to learn the search volume, but you should also take the extra step of manually searching in Google.

Just use the search string: allintitle: keyword and look for the final number. (You don't need to click through to the final page of Google like you do with QSR by the way)

Here's a screenshot:

In this case, "dovo straight razor review" has 35 allintitle results. If the search volume for this keyword is more than 140 (I haven't checked) then you'll have a KGR of 0.25 (35 divided by 140).

So this is way less competitive. It means on the whole internet, there are only 35 sites that have the words "dovo straight razor review" anywhere in their title, doesn't matter if there are other words or if the words are in a different order.

And because KGR keywords have fewer than 250 searches, not everybody is targeting them.

So you have low volume keywords that people aren't targeting, and very few sites optimized for them, which means any site that has some decent age and trust that targets them is going to stand a very good chance of ranking for them. Time and time again people in my Facebook group are saying KGR keywords are working like gangbusters for them.

Since "Keyword Research" is my team's training theme for this month, I figured I'd come to WA and share some of it with you all too.

Try the KGR method for yourself and let me know your results, they'll be even better than using just Jaaxy.

P.S I'm not trying to bash Jaaxy or the methods K+C teach. Jaaxy works well, but this is an even more accurate (albiet more time consuming) method.

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IveTriedThat Premium
This is one of the most useful posts in here. It's prefect for getting noticed with a newer site and will allow you to start climbing organic rankings fairly quickly while you focus on longer more competitive keywords as well.

I'd also recommend installing Keywords Everywhere. It's free and tells you just how many monthly searches are being conducted each month directly in the search results: https://keywordseverywhere.com/
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bryonbrewer Premium
Oh nice, that makes things easier
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BrianCh Premium
Hi Steve, I actually have this on my browser as well. The volume and the CPC I understand but I'm not sure about the competition factor? Please can you give me some clarity on this.

Thanks,

Brian
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IveTriedThat Premium
From the KE website:

Competition: The competition is a gauge of the number of advertisers that are running ads on Google adwords for this specific keyword. The number goes from 0 to 1, with lower values signifying less number of advertisers and higher values signifying more advertisers.
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bryonbrewer Premium
Yeah ignore the competition stat as it is for ads not seo
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BrianCh Premium
Excellent. Thanks, Steve.
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BrianCh Premium
Thanks, Dom.
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derekmarshal Premium
That is a fab tool! I actually prefer it to jaaxy!

Just to add when I start out a site I strictly stick to max competition of 50! not so focused on how many searches or traffic as naturally I will rank for a lot more LSI keywords. That is for the first 100 posts.

Second 100 posts Max comp of 75,
Third set of 100 posts Max Comp of 100

Then I'll continue like that slowly increasing the comp as site grows in content and domain authority.
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bryonbrewer Premium
300 posts is a huge task though
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derekmarshal Premium
Not really, not over a period of time. Only take about 10 months.
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bryonbrewer Premium
Fair enough. Too much for me, but if you are into writing content and don't mind, then yeah 10 months is nothing.
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Gopika1 Premium
Thanks. How do you use the info in that tool? I see vol, cpc and comp. What should I look for in the numbers?
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bryonbrewer Premium
Only look at the volume, everything else is related to paid ads
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Stella2 Premium
Thanks, Dom!

I'm going to play around with this and see how it works out. I can see the sense of it, so it should make a difference to ranking faster.
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bryonbrewer Premium
Yep. I always put a bunch of KGR articles on sites while waiting to rank for the juicier keywords
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BrianCh Premium
Hey Dom, you're the bomb! Thanks for this excellent advice. I do have to read through this a few times to get my thinking in line but I can see that this is well worth the effort.

Thank you,

Brian
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Zappades Premium
I just checked my today's post, it should rank great according to your theory. I have 32 searches and my website is the only one with the allintitle: keyword.
I only just published it but I don't find it yet.

I did the same check with an older post, 2 days ago, that ranks on page two. There I am also the only site with the allintitle: keyword but there are 112 monthly searches.

I think it is an interesting approach and will take it into consideration in future.
Thanks.
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bryonbrewer Premium
Presumably your site is quite new, so they may take a little bit longer to find their way to page one
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Zappades Premium
It's up for six months now and I have about 70 articles.

Well we'll see, there is a ton of content to follow :)
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SteveCrozza Premium
You have answered a question that I have been pondering for a while, specifically why the results didn't include the words in the exact order. Thank you
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bryonbrewer Premium
Exactly matching the keyword with your title used to be a pretty good way of ranking, but Google is smarter than that now. It still works well when you find very low competition KGR keywords though, which is why this method is considered old school.
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