This one scares me!

Last Update: March 25, 2019

We see so many scam attempts that we've almost become immune to them. But this one is so good, it scares me.

I'm sure you're all familiar with the typical inheritance scam which looks so phony you just laugh it off. Poor English, lots of typos and spelling errors. How could anyone take it seriously?

This one is different

First the envelope: it's neatly typed and, instead of a stamp, it bears an official-looking mark from Canada Post.

"Now, who do I know in Canada? Not a lot of people. It looks official, I'd better open it."

The letter itself bears a little logo and the words "Canada Trust". There's no address, just the website www.tdcanadatrust.com Yes, that's the real website for The Toronto-Dominion Bank [CA].

I'm greeted with "Dear Marion Black". Nothing generic here. They know who I am and have addressed me accordingly. It must be real!

The text of the letter is justified, has no spelling errors, and is written in perfect English.

I'm not going to give you the entire text of the letter, and I can't scan it because my printer/scanner has run out of ink and refuses to play nicely until I give it a drink.

Suffice to say that it's very similar to all the other inheritance scam emails I've received. I've been invited to pass myself off as next of kin to a deceased person to claim $12.9 Million USD "it will be shared between both of us on the ratio that we will agree upon".

The first step I'm asked to take is to reply to his email address and then he will provide me with more details.

The signature consists of the name, telephone number and email address, typed not hand-written.

I've reported it to Scam Watch in Australia. And now I'm trying to spread the word to as many people as I can.

Don't fall for scams

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PaulBoudreau Premium
Thanks again, Marion, for the heads up.

We, as a society, are creating monsters that are now eating away at our very doors.

I am in the process of re-reading "1984" by George Orwell, and the more I read and reread it, the more this monster becomes real.

As you well describe, these email scams have become so smooth and clean that they still manage to capture victims in their proverbial net.

Just imagine, a computer generated system sending hundreds of thousands of emails to hundreds of thousands of recipients.

A lowly less than 1% success rate will result in enough "identity theft" to live the dot.com lifestyle until the next great scam comes along!

Keep us our toes with your advanced warning systems.

Paul Boudreau
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MarionBlack Premium
It's been a while since I read about "Big Brother". I must get it out and dust it off. It's well worth reading again.
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PaulBoudreau Premium
It gets scarier with each reading.

Be forewarned.

Keep up the great work!

... and be careful of the "thought police".
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tbowyer Premium
Hi Marion.

Maybe it's a Nigerian "Prince" who has emigrated to Canada, learnt to write better English and acquired some domain knowledge and corporate culture. 😜😉

It's okay, I can make fun, I was born in Nigeria, so yar boo to anyone who wishes to take offence. Lol.

I'm glad that you've got an honest heart and didn't fall for the scam.

By the way, for those who think that Nigerian culture is very forgiving of the criminals who run these scams (but they're not all Nigerians nor do they even email from Nigeria if you know how to read email headers) it's because we all think that anyone who gets scammed like this was herself trying to participate in illegal activities, so frankly, who cares? Harsh, but to me, understandable.

Regards,
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dkohara Premium
It's unfortunate that an entire country's good name is tarnished by scammers and fraudsters, but until that changes, Nigeria is always looked upon as a scam source and therefore to be avoided (online, anyway).

Dave
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MarionBlack Premium
Yes, the people most likely to get caught by scams are those who want to take shortcuts. But some honest people get caught too.
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tbowyer Premium
"Nigeria is always looked upon as a scam source and therefore to be avoided"
Probably for the best all round, in my honest opinion.
I don't worry—this too shall pass away.
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silverwings Premium
One that "almost" got me was an email from apple saying I had purchased 100 and some dollars worth of something and I was to log in. You click the link and it takes you to a sight that is looks like apple. It ask for you info...I had typed in everything and something at the last second told me something is not right here. I almost gave them all my information. Then I worried that perhaps they were able to see what I had put in even though I didn't click thru and spent almost a day trying to change passwords etc to cover myself. I just HATE scammers. They are everywhere!
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MarionBlack Premium
Yes, they are everywhere and multiplying faster than rabbits.
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Maddy55 Premium
scam artists take advantage of greed and gullibility. I have reminded my parents and my MIL many times, that if you didn't enter a contest, then there is no way you could have won either. Inheritance scams prey on the greedy, who wouldn't want a million or two right? One should always ask themselves, why would this person send me this offer? They don't know me. Warning bells. Thanks for the heads up. It's good to know so we can help our more gullible seniors not to fall for these.
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MarionBlack Premium
The best thing we can do to protect others is to make them aware of the scams that proliferate in our world.
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KimAbuschin1 Premium
I have seen this many times in email and text scams. I am a technical support specialist and I believe the first time I saw this was over 10 years ago. Scams are such a problem today and they exist in so many different ways. The approach I learned in my training in IT Security was to always look very closely at the message in the same way you seem to be doing. This type is what I call the "shiny object" scam although that is just something I made up it is written in many different forms today promising to make you rich when in reality you will be victimized instead. This is a sure way to get your identity stolen and lose money in the process. Keep using your critical thinking and you'll be great. I learned from Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich that we can't get something for nothing so if you use that thought process you can't get scammed. Here is a similar one in real life.

My father passed this passed away this past July. I hadn't seen him in over twenty years because his wife didn't like his children and was abusive towards us every time we saw her. When I got there my cousin was there and he was having my father and his wife spend their money on things they didn't need. My father had Lou Gehrig's disease but somehow my cousin talked them into buying a brand new SUV when neither of them would be able to drive it. This was crazy because what he really needed was a wheelchair and possibly a device that could help him communicate or eat. He was becoming paralyzed and speech was very difficult. Needless to say he passed away very quickly just to escape the insanity of the people swarming around him like vultures. It's sad but even scams like this exist in families. My cousin didn't realize what I did for a living or studied until I called him a scammer and a con artist. Then he blocked me and went running the other direction as fast as he could. That told me everything I needed to know about his character and integrity. He is there right now just stealing whatever he wants from my Fathers house by staying close to my step-mother who isn't very intelligent. I tried to warn her but since she is a thief herself she thinks all others are the same way and sometimes the best thing we can do is let others learn the hard way. I would be very surprised if he hasn't cleaned her out by now of anything he wants. I might not have known anything but within the last few years my father was telling my sister stories of how much he didn't trust my cousin. He wanted his children to know that he was wrong about my cousin being a successful person and he didn't want us to trust him or anything he said or did.

In the end, he infringed on our legal rights of even hearing my fathers will. He doesn't know this yet but in time the law will be paying him a visit. I just wish I could be there when his world comes crumbling down because if a person could do this to their own blood relatives, there is no telling how many people he scams on a daily basis with his business. Unfortunately there isn't much we can do about scammers because the laws often protect them and not the victims. Perhaps that will one day change. We can only hope and perhaps elect people who we see as being honest and about change for the good.
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MarionBlack Premium
So sorry to hear that you not only know a scammer but he's related to you. Take care, Kim.
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Ioan64 Premium
Your Kim posture is relatively sad, I'm sorry you have experienced such a thing about your dad.
The problem with scammers is that they have multiplied like mushrooms after the summer rain.

Best wishes

Ioan(John in English)
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KimAbuschin1 Premium
Thanks for your reply. It all worked out in the end because most everything in that home was destroyed long ago including the home itself. The people who mattered in my life were no longer stuck doing for this person. I do believe that what you reap, you eventually sow. If stealing is someone's goal then all will probably be taken from them. However, if a person gives and helps then it often comes back in ways you might never expect. It is a lesson learned to pass onto my children and others so they can make better choices who to allow and keep in their lives. I think of a con-artist or scammer as a young child who never grew up like peter pan. They seem to behave as though others cannot see their motives when many can.
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KimAbuschin1 Premium
Thanks MarionBlack for bringing this out to the attention of so many. We need more awareness on the Internet of such things so that people know what to do to prevent becoming their next victim. The IT industry is very overwhelmed with this problem and I read and deal with it almost daily in my work. The answer is to share with others what you know so they recognize it when they see it, which is exactly what you did. Thank You.
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Ioan64 Premium
I'm sorry that something like this happened.
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Brenda63 Premium
The inheritance scam isn’t new, been in its circulation all over the world. I do not want to name the country but they call it a 411 scam from one specific country. Now, its every where not just one specific country where that 411 scam came from. Do research on Google. My hate husband fell for it also we live n the States and I’ve told him it’s scam not to do it good thing I blocked him from continuing because I did the research on Google.

Thanks for sharing.
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MarionBlack Premium
This scam is very old. Over recent years it's been limited to emails but this one came via the postal service. Because it looks so authentic it could fool many people who are not aware.
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Brenda63 Premium
Yep, Thats the exactly the one we got was through the snail postal mail using my late husband’s last name saying he got inheritance the problem was it asked to email then send proof of id that his last name matched then the next step is to wire money transfer of 10k it goes to a bank in London UK then someone there picks it up then sends it to that specific country (never to see money again first) before will send the inheritance. I stopped my husband this happened 20 years ago in (middle of 90’s) in St. Paul, Minnesota where we were living at the time. Yes, true it did look so authentic. The letter had name of lawyer in UK and goes on to email at yahoo something like that but there were problems right off the bat. The name sounded funny not a typical British name. I knew it was a scam my husband kept saying it wasnt but after my research he finally believed me and we were saved from losing our hard worked funds.

If you look at
scamwatch.gov.au

There is information about where the source of that scam comes from that particular country. It states the name of that country, thats where the scams originated from and they target elderly populations but my husband and I were much younger back then.

Its not a new scam correct. Hope you trash it dont send the email smart to send to Scam Watch.
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gartnerf Premium
Thanks for the heads up Marion! Yes, you have to be on your toes and not even open these types of emails any more. Most are spam or phishing schemes that they can hope someone will reply to so that can validate their next victim.

Also, do not click the "unsubscribe" or "confirm" links on any emails you do not know its origin as that is just a means of confirming your email as a "live one". Scammers will then add your info to a target database and know to ramp up their schemes against a verified account.

Eyes and ears open always...
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MarionBlack Premium
We always need to be careful, Frank.
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albear Premium
Marion, Thanks for the info, scammers are everywhere and getting more sophisticated every day. Here's what happened to me. I live in Alaska and my Grandson and family came to see us. They left and a week or so later I get a phone call going something like this. Hi Grandpa, how are you doing? I said fine, who is this? This is your grandson. I have 14 Grandkids which one are you? I'm Brandon, your Grandson. I say you were just here visiting what's going on? After we left you, we traveled around seeing Alaska and I got a call from my buddy saying he was getting married and wanted me to stand up for him. He lives in Florida so instead of going back home we made a detour to Florida. I rented a car and was out partying and got into a car accident. Since I had been driving and drinking, I got thrown in jail and need $1,500.00 to get out. My time is almost up on the phone so here is my attorney's phone number, give him a call as to how you can get the money to bail me out. I called my daughter (Brandon's mother) and she said Brandon was back in Ohio and back at work. I did get the number his "attorney" and called it but seen it had an area code of Baja, California. His attorney wanted me to send a certified check to his address, which I never did. I guess they are still waiting for it, but it just shows to what length these scammers will go. I called our police department and they did everything but tell me there was nothing they could do about it but they did make a note of the incident. The only thing I can think of is that they picked up the information when Brandon or his wife posted their trip to Alaska, but can't figure out how they got my information unless that was mentioned on Facebook too. Bottom line, they didn't scam any money out of me.
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MarionBlack Premium
People just don't realize the implications of the stuff they post on social media. They mention that they're visiting another city or country and that tells the whole world that their house is empty and just ripe for burglary. That's just one situation I can think of off the top of my head.

Stay vigilant, Al. Crooks are everywhere.
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Jenna11 Premium
Glad, they didn't, Al. So good you checked with your daughter!
It was a good one!

Aloha, Jenna
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AussieJeff Premium
G'Day, Marion.
Other Companies that pass on information with their "So-Called" privacy laws should be ashamed of themselves.

They get paid to release our privy info and don't seem to really care who they pass this onto.

Glad to see that the buggers have got their English sorted out - but the amount is quite suspect.

Thanks for the warning, Marion.
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MarionBlack Premium
This one is particularly sophisticated, Jeff. It looks so real that I'm sure some people will fall for it.
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Ioan64 Premium
Very well you did Marion,be sure it is a scam. No bank or official institution resort to such false letters.In Europe, scams are in the form of the '' Nigerian Letter '',or a retired US Army officer in Iraq that sends boxes of dollars or antique artifacts through the Red Cross Society Diplomatic Courier Services, bla, bla, bla...
The truth is that scammers are very inventive and in step with technology.

Best Regards,

Ioan
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MarionBlack Premium
I just hope that by spreading the word someone else will be saved from this scam (and others).
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Ioan64 Premium
Marion,I also hope the same thing, to find out how many people and not to be deceived by the puzzles of scammers on the internet and anywhere.

Be vigilant

Ioan
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dkohara Premium
I'm a bit of a stirrer, I can't help but play along. I've had replies back from Nigerian 'Princes' with photographs of them returned as instructed, with 'I am an idiot' written across their t-shirts, just to prove they were REAL. :-)

Last week I had a girl contact me out of the blue to help her as her dad was 'dying' and she needed $2,500. She sent photos of her and her 'father', supposedly living in New Orleans. I asked her for her bank details and she said she wanted the money paid into her Nigerian bank account and HAVE I NOT SENT IT YET?????. I told her my bank would need to vet her authenticity and she immediately blocked me on FB and Messenger. Do these people think we were born yesterday?

My friend also sent an iPhone to a guy in Nigeria as he said he needed the latest one. It was made of cardboard, but she went along with his insistence that she sent it. Very amusing.

Dave.
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AussieJeff Premium
Sounds like you are having a lot of fun there, Dave.
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MarionBlack Premium
How dare you not send the money, Dave! Shame on you.
🤣💌
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kiliwia62 Premium
Thank you, Marion, for the warning and yes, we can't just brush it off, the scammers certainly are doing their "homework" too and do come up with constantly new and more sophisticated scams.

It is so unbelievable but at the same time, it is so true.

Glad you reported it right away

Sylvia
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MarionBlack Premium
The best thing we can do is spread the word, Sylvia.
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CandP Premium
Hopefully not too many members here at WA would fall for something even as sophisticated as this but it's not the likes of us these people are going for. We feel so sorry for the less savvy people who do get caught up in scams like this and there will be plenty.
Colette and Philip
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MarionBlack Premium
Exactly, it's up to us more savvy people to warn the rest of the population, especially the elderly.
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MBartley Premium
Hi Marion, if these crooks put as much effort into a legit business they would be rich.
There is also a email Scam happening in Canada right now that looks official from Revenue Canada (Gov looking envelope & letterhead) stating your income tax refund is ready but they just need to have your information verified. They ask for your personal data so they can acquire your identity. Revenue Canada does not use email, to most of us it is an obvious scam but seniors are falling for it.
We must stay diligent !

Murray
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MarionBlack Premium
Perhaps both scams are from the same source. The best way to foil them is to make everyone aware.
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Barney44 Premium
Terrible when we find it necessary to filter everything we see through the scam filter of our minds. The scammers use every trick they can come up with to tempt us to jump in believing what they say is the truth.

Sometimes it is good to stop and think before acting.

Barry
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MarionBlack Premium
Unfortunately, some people will believe almost everything they're told.
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nurselizstar Premium
My, my, my...how far will these.crooked, lame, despicable thugs stoop to ruin someone's life!! Thank you Marion for sharing. Please everyone...if it's an unknown email, don't open it! If it's a letter that you have not requested, do not expect a million dollar letter to bless your long suffering life, and if this letter makes you spend money to make money, right in the trash!! I'm glad you were on top of it Marion!!
Yay Us!! 🌟
Liz"
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MarionBlack Premium
I wish I could save everyone from loss and heartache.
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nurselizstar Premium
We do what we can to save those in our corner of the world dear lady...and you're doing it well! 💕
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rubyandally Premium
Wow, an actual old school, 20th century, ink and paper postal letter?? That is scary! Must be full of DNA, fingerprints etc as well - how very bold of them! Check the postmark, it might be one of those letters lost in the mail for 50 years that is finally delivered and ends up featuring as the 'quirky' story on local evening news ;-)
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MarionBlack Premium
The letter was dated 18/March/2019. I think it was probably done on a computer but the envelope appears to have been typed on a typewriter.
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terri2018 Premium
Oh no! Also in Australia? We got every once in a while..
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MarionBlack Premium
This is the first snail mail scam I've seen in years.
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CDarling1 Premium
Yes, I received something similar a few weeks ago. Only it was through e-mail. And like yours, it was so professional looking and well written, I had to give it a second look. It was from Germany I know no one there. The person had the same last name as me.
I had to get my mom out of a similar jam a few years back. It was horrible. She had just started to get dementia. Be very careful.
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MarionBlack Premium
It's people like your mom that they are targeting. I'm 72 so perhaps they think I'm old.
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CDarling1 Premium
Exactly. She was 90 at the time. We had to take all her credit cards away. She was not a happy camper. But it had to be done. She's 97 now with dementia. Don't feel badly. I would be 70 this year and they have been targeting me for years now. I think once you turn 50 they think you're old.
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RonFrey Premium
Thanks for the advance warning, even the amount of $12.9 M is not as outlandish as some of the amounts I've seen.
I wonder if it has anything to do with the scammers we have seen here at WA, what with having your details et al - Just saying!
Cheers for now
Ron
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MarionBlack Premium
WA doesn't know my home address, Ron. Perhaps they found me in the telephone directory. Who knows?
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RonFrey Premium
Sorry Marion
Missed the part about the home address, that's actually stalking with intent, in a manner of speaking
Hope for your sake its a one-off
Be safe
Ron
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Tirolith Premium
I get heaps every day on the internet. I must be the richest man in the World when I get round to collecting all my inheritances one day. ha, ha.
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MarionBlack Premium
All you have to do is pay the tax and then you'll be able to collect them all.
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LindaF Premium
ya I feel into the trap a couple months back from Winners International. said I had won 700,000.00 that converts to just about a Million in Canadian.

They are still calling me every day at 8 am. and the RCMP can't do nothing about it. They use Bank of Montreal as there platform. so if you get a call from Winners International a 1833 # it is a scam.

I am still paying dearly for my stupidity. but when you are desperately in need you fall. They ask you to deposit so as they can clear the Package internationally. That is what I did. But then they came back and wanted more money I went to the bank and Guess what, ya your right "Scam". I am very informed about these things and I thought it would never happen to me, "but it did!" it can happen to anyone of us.

I was ready to shut down here at WA because this has set me back a lot. But then the members here at WA stepped in and are ready to help, some very good friends that I have made here at WA. see my post WA is a community that we can count on, the people here are amazing. And because of that I will be able to continue here with my work

always a better way
Linda
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MarionBlack Premium
So sorry to hear about your ordeal, Linda. Stay safe.
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Karin13 Premium
Thanks for the tip.

Karin
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MarionBlack Premium
Stay safe, Karin.
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APachowko1 Premium
Hi Mario
Just to let you know, here in the UK my telephone provider has a service called 'call safe', which is free . This services monitors all calls coming in, and if it doesn't recognise it, it will ask the person name and what the calls about. Most scammers and cold callers will hang up at the point.
Some will try it on, but you press a number and it will reject and block the number. All you need to do is put in all the numbers that you will accept and the system will recognize it.
Result no more cold calls
Antonio
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MarionBlack Premium
That would be good to have here in Australia. I refuse to answer my home phone now, it goes straight to messages.
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Zarina Premium
Yep, TD Bank is real. Hmm, thanks for letting us know, Marion. I had one of the accounts there, so if I were to receive this letter, I'd likely think it's a legit letter!

Today I also got a strange email from PayPal (first time), looked very real at first. Good thing I remember very well what stuff exactly I buy online lol.
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MarionBlack Premium
It really looks legit, Zarina. That's the scary part.
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Mick18 Premium
Thanks for the warning Marion. Haven't seen that one.
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MarionBlack Premium
This is the first one I've received by snail mail for years.
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APachowko1 Premium
Hi Marion
Here in the UK and all other places, the elderly fall for this scams. It literally costs them thousands and thousands of pounds, and the funny thing it they keep doing after being told not to!

In fact they get put on lists and other scammers will try it on. Be vigilant, take everything with a pitch of salt, and help the elderly to there tricks.

Thanks

Antonio
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MarionBlack Premium
We try our best to warn everyone but some people still get caught.
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Shalei67 Premium
Thanks, Marian for your post. Despite so much consumer advocacy and articles & blogs and websites about scams and what to look out for, as W.C. Fields once said: "There's a sucker born every minute." Sadly, there are people out there who STILL fall for this bullcrap. Much appreciate the info!
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MarionBlack Premium
It's so sad that people still fall for these scams.
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shadonna Premium
Thanks for the update Marion.
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MarionBlack Premium
This one's scary, Shane. Snail mail from Canada to Australia.
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johnwnewman Premium
Thanks for the warning, Marion!
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MarionBlack Premium
Stay safe, John.
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deelilah Premium
I just heard about a kidnapping scam. Parents here the voice of their child over the phone, and the the "kidnapper" sets up the ransom. The person who figured this out did so because the "kidnapper" referred to the child, calling it a him when it was actually a her. They said the voice sounded just like their daughter.
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MarionBlack Premium
That's even worse. Playing with parent's emotions.
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seconds2work Premium
Thanks, Marion
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MarionBlack Premium
Stay safe, LeNard.
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JagiR Premium
Wow scary! Today I got a call from Australia purporting to be Revenue Canada.
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LindaF Premium
one thing about that is revenue Canada never calls always sends mail but know there is email from revenue Canada that only you can access. So I guess they are taking it over seas know.
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Mordenrose Premium
There are people pretending to be from Revenue Canada calling to falsely claim you own a great deal of money. A friend of mine told them she was from the RCMP to see what they would do. It ended up with much swearing and awful name calling at the other end.
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JagiR Premium
It happens here all the time. We just ignore them, sometimes we have a back and forth.

But more people are becoming aware of this.

It’s too bad third parties give away our phone numbers. I’ve tried to opt out, but it still happens.
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MarionBlack Premium
I refuse to answer my home phone now. It goes straight to messages.
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hanley Premium
This was today.



Hello Customer
Due to a system upgrade, we couldn't charge your credit card on file for your amazon.com. Your membership benefit are currently suspended, update your credit card to keep enjoying amazon benefit or your account will be suspended.

Update

Desperately seeking credit card details
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Mordenrose Premium
Careful something similar happens with a false Netflix message.
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MarionBlack Premium
Sometimes these scammers border on genius.
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jkGst Premium
Thanks so much Marion. I have been scammed and it is no fun ! Some people are really good at it, but they are still low-lifes.
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MarionBlack Premium
I'm sorry to hear that, Janice. Stay safe.
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suzzziq Premium
It’s crazy what some people will do! Thanks for passing this on, Marion:)
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MarionBlack Premium
It's crazy that some people will actually fall for it but it does happen.
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apache1 Premium
Guess they much have used Grammarly to improve their usual spelling and typo;s
Glad we are familiar with them but there are still many who fall for it. hopefully none here.

Thanks for the update

Andre
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MarionBlack Premium
This one is breaking a lot of international laws, using the postal service for a scam is just one of them.
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apache1 Premium
They certainly are pushing their luck hopefully somewhere along the line they will get caught as this type has been going on for a while.
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RosanaHart Premium
Haven't had anything like this, glad to have your heads up!
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MarionBlack Premium
I worry about the people who might fall for the scam.
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RosanaHart Premium
Worry can be a good thing!
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Cherry21 Premium
The nerve of these people. How long does it take to sit and write a letter like that, Typing each word , wholeheartedly knowing what your doing as you sit there. I mean these people have no conscience and wear very dark shades when looking in the mirror. It is such a shame, It really is because you know somebody somewhere has fallen for that,
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MarionBlack Premium
I'd say they used a word processor like Microsoft Word and just changed the name. But I think the envelope was typed on a typewriter.
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David1967 Premium
Thanks, Marion, appreciate the heads up
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MarionBlack Premium
Stay safe, David.
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keishalina9 Premium
hi Marion ---- thanks kindly for the heads up on this one! ...

good to be informed -- and it sounds like they're getting more sophisticated .....

glad you caught this one -- if it's not too late -- suggest turn it over to the authorities to have them trace it .... especially if there's a postal meter mark on it ...

keep well, keep safe & happy ....
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MarionBlack Premium
The first thing I did was report it to Scam Watch. That's the Australian scam busters.
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keishalina9 Premium
... super! ... who'dya call? ....'scam-busters!' ... :)
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accad Premium
I'm interested in the signatories because I received a similar letter 4 years ago from "Trust Bank". Actually, I have a review of it on my site.
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MarionBlack Premium
Does the name Jimmy Jarrell ring any bells?
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accad Premium
That sounds new, Marion. But I have searched in the Google about the person who wants to have a 50-50 share with me and he is really an employee of that certain bank.
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MarionBlack Premium
Or someone else using that person's name to "prove" authenticity.
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accad Premium
Maybe, but he has an account on facebook and I think it's authentic because portrays their activity as a couple.
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hanley Premium
If they could just channel the talents into good maybe they would make some money. Unfortunately so many get caught out so being aware is necessary,'

Thanks, Marion
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MarionBlack Premium
There must be gullible people out there or these scams would have dried up years ago.
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lesabre Premium
Thank you Marion. We really have to watch ourselves
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MarionBlack Premium
Absolutely.
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AllanSiegel Premium
I hate scammers!!!!
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MarionBlack Premium
Ditto.
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Eliz65 Premium
Thanks for the heads up! It’s so sad we live in a world where there are a few bad eggs that we have to watch out for!
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MarionBlack Premium
It really is a sad reflection on the world we live in.
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nudge1969 Premium
I'll keep an eye out. Thanks Marion.
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MarionBlack Premium
Stay safe, Nigel.
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Traveller75 Premium
Thanks Marion
These scammers are getting better all the time and one has to be really careful nowadays. Thanks again for the heads up.

Wayne
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MarionBlack Premium
This is the best I've seen so far, Wayne.
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Jadatherapy Premium
Thank you for building awareness and sharing Marion

Much appreciated

Jennifer
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MarionBlack Premium
Stay safe, Jennifer.
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Jadatherapy Premium
Thank you Marion

All the best in making it happen here at Wealthy Affiliate

Jennifer
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