Nature unleashed its fury on Anguilla in the form of a category 5+ hurricane named Irma; After several days of warnings and tracking, she came like a bullet train destroying any and everything in its path.

I listened and watched from my bedroom through the two double French doors that are without curtains or shutters; I was never so scared in my life; the bullet like speed of the mixture of rain and wind looked like a sheet of stationary ice.

I heard a loud bang and I knew that the small 12 inch window to the guest rest room had been blown off, the hinges were a little rusted; the rushing wind blew the external bolt off the door threatening to engulf the entire floor. It was imperative to keep that door closed to prevent a build up of pressure inside the house. I also opened a window on the opposite side from which the wind was blowing, just in case.

There was an antique ice box which we also use as a liquor cabinet, I positioned the icebox behind the door and sat there for an eternal 45 minutes, holding the door shut as the wind pushed the icebox back at least 5 inches every two minutes.

As I sat there holding the door shut and pushing the icebox back, I watched the wind pounding on a metal side door creating a visible gap of at least a quarter of an inch, giving the impression that the wind was being blown from inside out.

On two separate occasions I had to scream at my wife for standing in front of the door, I knew for sure that her body could not survive a blow from it if it was blown open by a gust of wind in excess 200 miles an hour.

Thank God it was over and we were still alive, wiggles the cat emerged from his hiding place visibly traumatized.

The first job was to access the damage, the front number plate and the back bumper of the Toyota was gone, nowhere to be seen. Part of the wooden railings from the front balcony had fallen and damaged the front fender; the entire front grid and both number plates from the Vitz was ripped off and must have flown like a kite.

Despite the 200 + miles per hour winds and the earthquake like shaking of the concrete structure, the house suffered cosmetic damages, the small window from the small bathroom was gone and half of one French door on the first floor, both were due mainly to weaknesses in the frame which were there before the hurricane.

There was no way to escape some water, wherever there was a cease the water found its way in, but it was not a huge problem.

The full shock of the damage caused by the hurricane was was not experienced until two days later.

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Swangirl Premium
Wow, I am so glad you are ok! Your description is great, very interesting and scary to read. Thank you for sharing it.
Jessica
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codevonish Premium
Thanks for visiting; I really do miss the WA community and there are still Internet challenges, plus electricity seems a long time away.
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DaveSw Premium
Wow, what an experience...Thank goodness you and the wife are ok, the material things can be replaced...Many people do not realize how major events like this change your perspective on many things...We used to call these Significant Emotional Events (SEE)...

It often is the case that only AFTER the event is over do you slowly come to realize and analyze what happened, how you were feeling and how you feel now about these events. It sounds like you are at that point...

Thank goodness both of you are OK...

All the best...

Dave : )
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codevonish Premium
Before the hurricane the Island was suffering a downturn in the economy, young people who were holders of a European or British passport were leaving; residents from other caribbean countries were returning home.
The future now looks dismal; it may teke 6 months for tourism to resume, people are hurting and hopes are on the UK offering relief as both France and the Netherlands are doing for St Maarten/St Martin who were also devastated by the hurricane.
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SamiWilliams Premium
Courtney,
Good job of relaying the fear. Grateful that you guys were unhurt. It happens so quickly.
Best wishes for getting lined back out again.
Sami
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codevonish Premium
Thanks,life is fairly primitive at present, shortage of fresh green produce and when there is you can only buy for one day as there is no electricity.
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Kickbacked Premium
Am glad you and your wife survived!
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codevonish Premium
Thanks,There was only 1 death in Anguilla, It is a blessing when you consider the damage and the number of roofs that were lost.
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Kickbacked Premium
Very amazing!
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Carol46 Premium
So grateful you are all safe! How terrifying!
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codevonish Premium
I was never so afraid in my life, there is a belief that some of the wind gusts might have been close to 300 miles per hour; we had 40ft containers that were flying through the air.
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Swangirl Premium
Wow, that is incredible. I have been in 100 mph wind. I cannot imagine.
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bigrog44 Premium
Thanks for sharing, Courtney.
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MKearns Premium
I thought of you during this process Courtney. I hope your art exhibits have survived!
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codevonish Premium
Thanks Mike, thankfully the gallery suffered no damage, my concern is for my tools and equipment which were housed in a 40ft container and the roof was punchered and water got in, since there is no electricity I cannot check them as yet. I have a weakness for tools so there is quite a selection.
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ecomtom Premium
Wow. Courageous of you to ride the storm out. Glad you, your wife, and your cat are ok, and the damage was not too severe. Tom
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codevonish Premium
Than you, I am lucky to be able to access generator operated electricity and Internet via a rented white gadget supplied by Flow through the kindness of a business friend .
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