Your Alexa rank and why you should (probably) leverage it

Last Update: February 08, 2018

Did you know that lots companies use your Alexa rank as a primary determining factor for sending you a review item, or not?

Well, it's true!

I'm not talking about affiliate programs, but companies you might approach to ask for review samples from. Not all of them do, but some do and one of those could potentially be a company you want to work with.

Sometimes, a company will want to see your Global Alexa rank under 100,000 before they'll even consider sending you items. Sometimes they will want it under 200,000, and sometimes they won't even consider your Alexa rank as a worthwhile metric to take into consideration (it's really not and I'm going to tell you why).

That's why it pays to... leverage... your Alexa rank.

It's really easy to do, especially if you're constantly working on your site. All it takes is downloading the Alexa Toolbar (https://www.alexa.com/toolbar), activating it, and then you'll be well on your way.

Seriously, that's all it takes. Over night, you might see your rank climb up a few hundred or few thousand points depending on where you are now. Over time, your Alexa rank will continue to increase and eventually you'll be where those pesky companies want you to be.

Another option is installing the Alexa Widget to your website, but that's not really necessary as the Toolbar will increase your ranking at a steady pace.

The fact that these rankings are so easy to manipulate are why the Alexa ranking system is a complete waste of time for companies to monitor. But, some still do, in fact some of the biggest companies out there do.

Why? I have no clue.

It's like being stuck between a rock and a hard place. On one side, you have big companies living in the past and using old/worthless metrics as their basis for evaluation, on the other side you have an old/worthless metric that you should, for some reason, still consider "leveraging".

It's up to you whether you work on increasing your Alexa ranking, or not. But, if you choose not to, don't be surprised if you're eventually turned down for a review sample based on a metric that no one should follow anyways! You might get 4/5, but that 5th company who turns you down might just be the one you actually wanted to work with.

Is it worth the risk to not?

That's about it for this post. Just a short, to the point post. Wow, right?

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MozMary Premium
Wow, right!
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buffetearns Premium
Thanks!

Wayne
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bthiel Premium
Not a problem, Wayne!
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