Remarkable Prize

Last Update: January 13, 2017

As humans, we are inclined to move from one thing to the next, including moving from one extreme to the other. This means also moving from overthinking to underthinking. It can be safely concluded that overthinking can result in negatives like under-productivity. In the same vein underthinking can also have an undesirable effect on result. However, we need to take stock of the remarkable prize we can derive from allowing ourselves the opportunity to think sufficiently.

Of course, we can develop the habit of thinking about life's issues enough, without over- thinking. We can strike a balance. When we allow the brain to think through issues, we solve problems and learn. By taking on some amount of problem solving thinking, we challenging and help to nurture the brain.

There are studies which indicate that an active brain makes new link between brain cells. When this connection happens, other cells communicate with one another, thus supporting the brain to store and retrieve information more readily regardless of one's age.

There is clear evidence that learning through challenging ways, impacts the brain very positively, and can provide neuroprotection against dementia. According to the latest statistics in 2016, 44 million people around the world are living with dementia, and this is likely to double in twenty years.

Those brain researchers conclude that if we do not challenge our brain muscles, these muscles can waste away, and we can experience rapid decline in cognitive ability.

Isn't it a highly possible, remarkable prize here at WA, that as we all toil to sustain and improve our financial lives - we are also working to improve, sustain and preserve our brain power.

What do you think?

Here's wishing everyone a calm and relaxing weekend.

Sheila.

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lynnsam61 Premium
I totally agree with this Sheila. Just like with any other organ in the body "use it or lose it" applies.Healthy social interaction has a positive effect on our mental health.
Erica
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brooksbode90 Premium
That's so very true, Erica, thanks much for your contribution.
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GlenPalo Premium
Great post, Sheila. I was diagnosed and treated for hyperparathyroidism last year. It gave me cognitive problems including inability to concentrate or couldn't keep my concentration. Plus I would forget simple things like turning off the stove if I got distracted by another thought crossing my mind. But after surgery, my brain returned to normal. The brain is an amazing thing.
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brooksbode90 Premium
Thank you, Glen, I rejoice with you for that great return, amazing thing indeed.
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Goson Premium
Thanks for this great post, Sheila
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brooksbode90 Premium
Thanks much for viewing it that way, and for stopping by, Goson.
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ArmaniTol Premium
This is a good post, Sheila. Thanks for sharing. A question to ask is that if a brain doesn't get challenged enough, does it lead to senility?
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brooksbode90 Premium
Thanks for your kind response, Armand, you're welcome, It wouldn't surprise me, and I think senility is related to one or the other of the different dementia.
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MKearns Premium
Good post. this makes sense Sheila!
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brooksbode90 Premium
Thank you, Michael, I really appreciate that.
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