Since there has been some buzz about copyright laws here at WA lately, I thought I would post these questions, in hopes that it would not only help me but also others, especially us newbies. 1. It is my understanding that you need to get a copyright license for posting certain things on your website. How does one go about getting permission and obtaining a license? 2. How much does it cost to get a license for copyrights? 3. Does this pertain to the images you can get on Google that say they are free? 4. I have heard that sometimes the way to get better quality images is to pay for them. Is this cost per image or are their websites where you can pay for these images and get as many as you want? 5. What are the names of the best websites to purchase images? 6. Are there websites that provide free images and if so, what are the names of these websites? Could there ever be an issue with copyright in this case? 7. I am getting ready to write an article about a gentleman who has a website that promotes him. Do I need to ask that website's permission to post a couple of his youtube videos? Thanks in advance for all the good answers I know I will receive!
Join the Discussion
Write something…
Recent messages
IvanHLP Premium
Does this mean i cannot use images from Google for my blogs?
Reply
@RICH. Premium
Not unless the copyright holder specifically states that you may. I recommend that you check out legitimate free resources such as Microsoft http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/ or premium stock libraries such as Fotolia http://www.us.fotolia.com or 123RF http://www.123rf.com where millions of images are available to licence for a $1 a pop or less via subscription. Rich.
Reply
IvanHLP Premium
So i can use Microsoft images as much as i want?
Do i need to state its from microsoft images on my site?
Reply
@RICH. Premium
Nope. Microsoft purchase licenses from several stock libraries that allows them to release the images into the public domain, you don't have to give their images accreditation. Rich.
Reply
IvanHLP Premium
okay, i was starting to get worried that a 6 figure bill will be at my doorstep.
Reply
@RICH. Premium
LOL, nah, at the worst it's only five figures http://d.pr/f/cFP0 Rich.
Reply
IvanHLP Premium
:O WOW
Reply
jatdebeaune Premium
Beverley's tutorial is so good. I also need to read it.

I've been using istockphoto.com and gettyimages.com. You have to pay for images, but they're pretty good.

I haven't been happy with the free resources, but the Microsoft one that Rich suggests looks very good.

Of course you can always use your own photos (ones you've taken yourself). I have a copyright notice at the bottom of every page in my websites. Don't know how much it protects, but it's there.
Reply
@RICH. Premium
Hey Joan.

If you're taking own photos that include people or private property you should also get them to sign a release. Free copies are available via Fotolia here: http://en.fotolia.com/Info/Releases

"Good and valuable consideration" can simply be $1 but it's best to PayPal them the amount so that you have proof they've received it.

Rich. x
Reply
jatdebeaune Premium
Good information Rich.

What if you take pictures of nature? If it's a flower in your own backyard, then no prob. What if it's the Eiffel Tower, for instance? If you take a picture of the White House, you have to get Obama and Co. to sign off on it? What about Niagara Falls, in that it is "famous" nature? Of course, taking a picture of a celebrity would apply.

All hypothetical situations.

If you photograph your own physical product (something you've manufactured), then what?

If you have a brand name, it's best to trademark it, but that's very expensive coming out of the gate.

When you do your own graphics, I guess you're home free as long as you include a copyright notice. Though someone else can infringe on you.

They make it so darn complicated. Thank you. Betcha not too many people know this stuff.
Reply
@RICH. Premium
Hey Joan.

Yes. It's very, very complicated. That's why I can only offer some general guidelines!

It's interesting you mentioned the Eiffel Tower. It's a breach of copyright within France and some other jurisdictions and therefore illegal to reproduce an image of it taken at night due to the lighting holding a design copyright. It's why you won't find recent images showing the current lighting display of it in the major stock libraries. http://d.pr/i/yrqS

This is why I recommend that people use reputable stock libraries where the liability for an image is on them. Not you. They will ensure that the relevant copyright agreements are in place and any model and property releases have been signed prior to making the image available for licensing.

Most premium stock libraries also offer a legal guarantee, ie: http://www.istockphoto.com/help/licenses insofar as they will contribute towards any costs in a dispute up to the sum of $10,000 and up to $250,000 for an additional premium. The higher figure protection is often purchased where the image is to be used in print and there is the risk that an entire print run of a brochure, book, magazine etc. might have to pulped should a dispute arise.

If a dispute does arise it can be extremely costly to defend. I always recommend negotiating and settling immediately. Many of the stock libraries employ people full time to find unlicensed copies of their images. In the UK, a *comp* thumbnail image from Getty got left in place on a website by an outside designer. The website owner ended up paying out almost $40,000 in costs before it even reached court. If you're interested, here's a downloadable PDF detailing the circumstances: http://d.pr/f/gVXO

Rich. x
Reply
jatdebeaune Premium
Interesting about the Eiffel Tower, had no idea.

I imagine the more exposure you get, the more important your site is, the more potential liability you have. If you publish something that is not your right to do so, then they'll come after you. Trick is to make sure you're not infringing on someone else's property.

I know there's a lot of unintentional infringement happening online, out of ignorance.

Better to be safe than sorry. Of course, you can always have an image-less site. Only kidding.
Reply
@RICH. Premium
LOL. Your site doesn't even have to rank before Getty lands you with a four-figure bill. :( http://d.pr/28oQ Rich. x
Reply
jatdebeaune Premium
Now you've done it. I'm shivering.
Reply
Kathy1952 Premium
Hi Joan! Thanks for all the good information you and Rich have posted here. Would you mind sending me the wording for the copyright notice on your website? You can PM me with it. This information is so eye opening! ;)
Reply
jatdebeaune Premium
Sure Kathy, I'd be happy to.
Reply
Kathy1952 Premium
Thanks, Joan! Appreciate it very much! :)
Reply
Kewl Web Premium
Kathy I have been using http://depositphotos.com/ The pricing is similar to Fotolia. I find it saves time searching the web for photos & it gives me peace of mind - not having to worry about breaking copyright laws. Great discussion information :)
Reply
Kathy1952 Premium
Thanks for the link, Devan. I will look into this. :) And thanks for your comment. Appreciate it!
Reply
@RICH. Premium
You almost lost me at the headline Kathy, I thought you were asking about that nasty scribble, scribble stuff that apparently starving people do in Parisian garrets. :P

Copyright is a hugely complex issue and jurisdiction dependent, so this is just some very basic, generalised guidelines.

In simple terms, copyright is always held by the creator unless specifically contracted for. It's a common misconception for example, that if you commission and pay a photographer to say take portraits of you, then you own the copyright to those photos. You don't. They remain with the photographer unless you specifically contract to purchase the copyright.

It's the same with the written word, which is why books are shown as copyright to the author, not the publisher.

There are obvious exceptions, where someone is employed full time on a newspaper for example, and their employment contract states that in return for their salary, works created by them during working hours are owned by the publication.

To give you some simple but far from complete answers:

1. You need to check each and every image and know the terms under which the copyright holder allows it to be used. Just because an image appears on Google and isn't labelled as being copyright doesn't make it free to use. The only person who can say whether it can be used or not is the copyright holder or their representative.

Furthermore if an image contains recognisable people or private property then it needs appropriate releases signed by those portrayed.

2. How much does licensing cost? It can be free or require an outlay of millions of dollars. There are some fantastic legitimate free resources such as Microsoft's http://d.pr/CbMV and many stock libraries such as Fotolia http://d.pr/3coE charge as little as $1 on an ad-hoc basis for the right to use an image how you want, when you want and as many times as you want. It can come down to less than 20¢ per image on various subscription plans.

3. Never rely on an image search from Google or any image search engine. The copyright holder may not be the person who uploaded the picture. How would you feel if an image of you that a friend shared on their Flickr stream for example, ended up on a site about incontinence issues or a young family member ended up illustrating a site about child abuse?

4. It is generally true that high quality relevant images are most easily found within stock libraries as they're in the business of providing them. It always surprises me that people will spend hundreds of hours on building a website but baulk at spending a few bucks to easily licence legitimate, relevant, high-quality images.

5. I recommend you work through Diva B.'s training on finding images for your website: https://my.wealthyaffiliate.com/training/where-to-find-images-for-your-website I personally favour Fotolia as a first paid stock library for newcomers.

6. I like Microsoft as a starting point for free images and Beverley's training includes a number of other legitimate resources.

7. If the gentleman's videos were uploaded by by the copyright holder with his permission then you can embed the YouTube link into your website without risk.

Hope the above is of some help!

Rich. x
Reply
Kathy1952 Premium
Thanks, Rich! This is extremely helpful! I'll go back to Beverley's training and check it out more thoroughly. I appreciate you taking the time to comment. :) This is good stuff!
Reply
Garry69 Premium
THANK YOU Kathy FOR YOUR BLOG MAKES ONE THINK AM i RIGHT IN DOING THIS ONLINE OR AM i IN ERROR.
Reply
Kathy1952 Premium
Right, Garry! So I am hoping we will get some answers from the masters. :)
Reply
Top