You’re your they’re their there hear here and Beer.

Last Update: April 24, 2018

You’re your they’re their there hear here and Beer.

I know the English language can be challenging and here’s the nub: It can be downright confusing at times.

A really good English teacher, friend of mine has developeda few sentences to help people understand the difference between words

Pronounced the same

Spelt differently.

Do you ever wonder which “where” to “wear”?

Has their there ever tripped of your tongue and into thespell check hell?

Tarry no more, (that is “wait” no more,) just jump into thispictorial land of happy spelling.


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CarolMeador Premium
Cute. Yes, English can be very confusing!
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viyee Premium
Thanks Carol.
I think it is the most colourful of languages but very challenging for non-native speakers.
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CarolMeador Premium
That's true. I've heard that it is a very difficult language to learn because there are so many inconsistencies and exceptions to the rules, as well as words that sound alike, but have totally different spellings and meanings. Keep up the good work, Peony.
Carol
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WaynePro Premium
:-) , thanks, Peony. Yes, the English language can be very challenging!!

Wayne
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viyee Premium
"They're there in front of their house. One of my favourite sentences.
Must get a grip on thinking these up late at night.
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WaynePro Premium
My friends here in Hong Kong, where I am currently living and working always complain to me about how difficult the English language is.

Wayne
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CarolMeador Premium
I can believe that, Wayne. I know a lot of native English speakers whose grammar is atrocious. I think our non-English speakers here at WA are very brave and dedicated to write their posts and websites in English. I know it must be very time consuming and difficult, and am in awe of their courage to tackle a platform that requires so much effort from them. Carol
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WaynePro Premium
Absolutely agree, Carol.

Wayne
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viyee Premium
Total Agreement there.
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viyee Premium
When you look at how the language developed over 2000 years, it is not surprising.
We have roots in Latin, Anglo Saxon, Norman French. Add in the 200 years we sailed the worlds seas and brought back phrases and (often miss-spelt) foreign words, there are more exceptions to rules than regular words.
We also have a lot of strange pronunciations which come from pure laziness. Things we say because it is easier to pronounce.
There are at least 3 ways to say everything.
Add in the variations on the language: Australian, South African, American, Singaporean (See Singlish,) African variations and of course our own dialects in the UK.
("Dinner" can be "supper" or "tea," depending on the geographical source.)
Then there are the contractions: can't, "wanna"....
I love it
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Larmu189 Premium
Thanks for share
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viyee Premium
Thanks Lar. hope you enjoyed it.
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MojalefaR Premium
I love the English language for that and I try by all means in my writing to use the new, not so ordinary words I learn. There is just beauty in that!

“Tarry no more...” I lime that!

Awesomeness!
Mojalefa.
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viyee Premium
Thanks Mojalefa.
I was going to end with an explanation about the "beer," and forgot....
Beer is a small and exquisitely beautiful village in Devon, South Western England.
It has been inhabited for at least 6,000 years and has been a smuggler's paradise in the past.
All this with a current population of under 2,000 people.
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MojalefaR Premium
Thank you very much. More information I did not have.

All the best
Mojalefa.
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Steven-A Premium
I'll go for the beer then it all seems correct
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viyee Premium
Thanks Steven.
A really realistic guy.
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