An Unexpected Paying It Forward Event.

Last Update: December 05, 2019

It was indeed an unexpected paying it forward event and one that has given me website post 'to boot' You see, I've already written this post once, got to about 600 words and realised that it was just getting to long, I was starting to waffle and philosophise. Good for the site, not good for here. The story itself can stand on its own to feet. Less is more.

That said, part of my rambling had to do with character traits and how they can appear from nowhere and you have to appraise them to see if they are actually flaws, or just blips that we can do something about. Anyway, here's how it went and I will try to be succinct. As if.

'Jess' the XJS is up for sale. If, she sells then that will be a huge helping hand towards the next project. If not, then that's alright too. I'm easy either way. Yesterday I had a message come through the listing. Here's what it said:

"Hi, I have a bit of an emergency! I have driven my 1978 pre-HE up to near you for a photo shoot but the left rear lens cover has fallen off. The photographer and journalist are literally waiting around as we try to source a replacement. Would you be willing to sell/lend/rent me yours (even if only for a few hours!)"

They left their mobile number for me to make contact. I am ashamed to say that my first reaction was one of cynicism. I thought it had to be a scam to get my mobile number. Then I would be inundated with calls about using some service to sell my car. Canvassing at it best.

My initial reaction took me aback. Why so cynical ? It could be totally genuine. Then I cut myself some slack and thought that 'wary' was a better word to use and that if I trod carefully then the situation could be managed better. I'll play along but make sure I'm covered, I mean they could come and get the lens and never bring it back, there's that cynical side coming back...no, wary, cautious. Here's my reply:

"My rear passenger lens has a chunk missing, if you check to photo's you'll see it. You're welcome to use it, if its suitable and fits. Just need to have you leave a deposit, if that's acceptable. Obviously you'll get it back when the lens comes back."

I thought that was fair enough. I added my mobile number, trust was working its way back in. Within a minute my phone rang. We chatted briefly and I gave my address. I removed the lens and within half an hour he had arrived. At the door he was in the process of taking his watch off, to leave with me. I stopped him and said it wasn't necessary, another brick in the wall of tust I was trying to rebuild, trying to restore my own sense of 'right'. He also borrowed a bucket and sponge. Lens fitted he went on his merry way.

About four hours later, he returned and before he'd knocked the door, had fitted the lens back on my car. He told me the story of his XJS and that the previous owner was the journalist and the article would be going in a national automobile magazine (reputedly the oldest running of its type) He then offered me some cash for the deed, which, of course, I refused and he went on his way.

By the end of it all, I felt like I had redeemed myself. It would have been very easy in the first instance to just ignore the message. We may have a propensity to be a certain way, act in a certain manner, these can be loosely described as our character traits. Going against popular belief, they are not hardwired.

Other times, as in this case, we react in a way that surprises us. This doesn't mean that is who we are, just who we happened to be at that precise moment. Being able to realise this and adjust accordingly is more a reflection of who you actually are.

Unfortunately being cynical, wary and cautious can seem to be prerequisites in the art of survival in todays world. It is down to us to decide how much of these we need to use, to navigate through life. Sometimes you do have to take a leap of faith and hope that you will not be disappointed.



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Tirolith Premium
Taking a leap of faith is becoming riskier as scamming is the in thing now.

As we have progressed since the second world war we have spoilt the young ones, who have spoilt their young, so we now have a spoilt give me, but nill in return attitude, in the young.

I hate salesmen and want to help anyone and being a car repairer for 50 years if I see a friend with car headlights going yellow I get them to come to my place for a cuppa and buff their headlights clear for them in ten minutes.

That is what helpers and what friends do at no charge.

WA is all team helpers making the internet honest again.

Tom.
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Twack Premium
Integrity is key in all that we do, I think. Two of my friends run a garage and their catchphrase is 'repair not replace'. The amounts of money they have saved customers over the years is probably staggering but it's how they roll.
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Tirolith Premium
When I was managing a Ford dealership I went to an insurance company and quoted to repair a rear-guard with a small slice in it.

I quoted to repair and not replace it.

We repaired it and a day later they sent an assessor to see how we did it.

This day and age tradesmen do not know how to repair cars the old way.

Good to see you know friends doing it the right way.
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JeffreyBrown Premium
It is so true especially in today's world--a part of us wants to help, but another part of us has either been "bitten" before when we did, or know someone or have seen a story of someone who has. "But I wouldn't do that" someone says to me on more than one occasion, which I promptly tell them, "if I had a dime for every time I've heard that, I'd be a millionaire!" Nevertheless, Twack, sometimes our inner selves do need to take that leap of faith. I have on one or two occasions and have come out alright. I think maybe we have to trust our gut instincts! Anyway, interesting story--thanks for posting!

Jeff
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Twack Premium
You're welcome Jeff. So true, trusting that 'feeling' and acting on it before our brains take over and put the barriers up. Maybe it's all about the odds, we just have to make sure we're clued up on the 'form' of each scenario as it comes along.
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JeffreyBrown Premium
Exactly, Twack--it seems that a case-by-case basis is warranted!

Jeff
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HeidiAnders3 Premium
You are a very cautious person and that is extremely important to be. I feel as most times, I'm overly cautious. Your post is making me step back and do some searching. I wonder how many opportunities I've missed because I've been too wary... great post!

So happy your situation was a good one in the end!!🎉
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Twack Premium
Hey Sis. I'm sure there are plenty of 'quotes' out there that urge us to throw caution to the wind, be brave and all that. Different situations require different levels. In this case the worst would be I'd get bombarded with sales calls, the best was that when the publication comes out, I'll buy it and with the same verve as a child in a sweet shop, will point and say "That's my lens, there."
What gave me pause was the fact that I saw what it 'might not be' and that's sad but also true.
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starfalex123 Premium
Twack,Thank for sharing such positive thoughts .keep up the good work. All the best to you on your journey at WA. Fitzgerald
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Twack Premium
You are very welcome Fitzgerald and thank you so much.
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laparra1 Premium
Good Morning Twack,

This is a nice story.

My belief is that everybody is my friend until they show that they do not deserve my friendship.

I once had a partner who was the exact opposite.
He always said that people first had to prove that they deserved his friendship.

Life does not function like that and he was a lonely soul.

Greetings from the south of Spain,
Taetske
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Twack Premium
Hi Taetske, I agree with you, I try never to have any preconceptions. It's always dificult though when you don't know someone form the start and they might have an agenda. Just have to hope the hairs standing up on the back of your neck are from the breeze.
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laparra1 Premium
That made me laugh. I have long hair they cannot stand up.

All the best, Taetske
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