How The Gutenberg Editor is Destroying your WordPress Website

Last Update: August 26, 2020

Using the Gutenberg editor at all is setting you up for failure in the future. When you use the Gutenberg editor, it is actively destroying your database.

Wordpresses main responsibility is not the design of your website, but to saving and retrieving your content from a database on your hosts web server.

It’s important that your content has as little information as possible of styling. There will always be exceptions, like say when you want to have a bit of text or an image centered on the page. Then you might want to insert an inline tag to make that happen, but this should be limited.

If you have too much of this styling within your content, it pollutes the content and can make it difficult to make changes in the future. Too much of this styling will extend the load time of each page.

If you want to make changes in the future, then you'll need to spend a lot of time cleaning up these extraneous styling tags on each and every page in your site. Gutenberg has littered your content with an enormous amount of non-standard, Wordpress-specific, junk styling tags.

Even if you don’t think you’ll be making changes in the future, your content is still littered with a huge mess of styling tags which shouldn’t be there, intermixed with your content. Styling tags belong in the .css documentation and they should be constructed with industry-standard CSS styling.

Additionally, the styling that Gutenberg provides, such as the spacing between paragraphs and between headings and paragraphs, you're just stuck with what you're given, unable to make adjustments.

If you take a look at your content you’ve created using Gutenberg, you’ll notice all kinds of junk that Gutenberg automatically inserted.

Notice how your page is littered with the comment tags wrapped around you paragraph tags.

Gutenberg uses these comments as opening and closing tags for their blocks.

All of these tags are cluttering your content and causing the rendering of your pages on browsers to be slower. Also notice all the tags and the white space.

This is not good for SEO.

When you ask for multiple paragraphs, instead Gutenberg gives you one paragraph, but separates the text using <br><br> tags everywhere.

With the Classic Editor, when you ask for an H1, H2, or H3 tag, you get exactly that. In Gutenberg, when you ask for a heading tag, you get something like:

What the heck is that?! That's NOT a header tag! Browsers and Google don't recognize those as heading tags.

My point is that these tags are extraneous junk that don't need to be, and shouldn't be in your content. You want NO styling, or the least amount of styling as possible within your content.

Gutenberg is breaking the all the rules of the best practices of web development. It's opposite of the concise way that well constructed HTML files and CSS files are supposed to work.

Under Gutenberg, it's impossible to follow official industry-wide web-design standards.In Wordpresses original editor, and now in the Classic Editor plugin, paragraphs and image tags are straight forward, no extra, unnecesary garbage is intermixed with your content.

The heading tags will encase your heading text, like it should. If you ever want to move your content in the future to another platform, a content manager system that's not Wordpress, by using the Classic Editor, your content will still be rendered as it's supposed to, without any modifications.

If you try to move content that's been built with Gutenberg, nothing will render correctly, without enormous amounts of work eliminating Gutenberg's crap tags. You'd then have to create new class styles in your CSS file to accomodate Gutenberg's miscellaneous classes, like the class="has-large-font-size", just to adapt it.

Gutenberg saves the HTML in the datebase. Because of this, the content and the styles are locked together. Every change you make to the block's HTML, it breaks the blocks. Hundreds of developers continue to complain about this.

With Gutenberg's system, there is no structural integrity at all! It's not a transportable structure. It's very shortsighted on Wordpresses part. We're being force-fed this garbage without realizing what a disaster it truely is. Your pages will render slower in browsers with Gutenberg. It's garbage, just like all of the block-style editors.



The block editor can make it easier for non-techy people. I understand that, but if you want to keep your content clean and free of unneeded, extraneous junk, then use the Classic Editor Plugin.

Instead of WP forcing us into their crappy editor, why not let administrators choose the editor they want to use through the config.php file? This would be a much cleaner solution than having to install the extra Classic Editor plugin.

The option to disable Gutenberg should be available.

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JohnJStanley Premium Plus
At Jay's webinar I asked this question on behalf of you guys for clarity on your issues raised (& to check ChrystopherJ is right, which he is right)
Jay at 41'10" to 42' shows the rendered version from Block Editor and Classic Editor are identical.
Furthermore he said the code (inspect element) is no different, the code is exactly the same
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ChrystopherJ Premium Plus
Thank you for confirming :-) It’s always good to check what other members tell/advise you here :-)
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JohnnyMark1 Premium Plus
Not to contest anyone's opinions or experiences, but this is my recent experience: I never before used an image-optimizer, I always used Photoshop to resize and resample images before 'exporting' them as 'Save for web'. Then I would upload them into WordPress.

I recently installed Ewww image optimizer, although I know WA now auto adds Kraken plugin to new sites. The plugin was still able to greatly improve many Photoshop-optimized images, so now I'm sold on image optimizers.

I no longer have any caching plugins installed, but am able to earn a Google PageSpeedInsights score of 98 for mobile and 99 for desktop.

I suppose this is a Site Support question, but I've wondered, if when I make changes to the site, and I decide to clear the cache from within WA, does anyone know if I need to revisit pages and posts, so they'll be re-cached?
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ChrystopherJ Premium Plus
Sounds great :-) If you also want to include the WebP format, I would consider using Imagify, or similar, as long as you chose one that can create & serve the images, as some only seem to create and not serve, or vice versa, which is just crazy.

As for what to do after clearing the SitePlus+ Cache, if you don't visit the pages/posts yourself, which could get tedious when you have 100's of posts, it might load slightly slower for the first visitor, but then all other visitors thereafter will get the freshly cached version. Unless WA notices a change with your website, then clears the cache by itself, it will then wait for the next visitor before caching the post/page again.

As far as I am aware, WA do not preload their caches, it is performed when a vistor requests a page/post.
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JohnnyMark1 Premium Plus
Hey Chrystopher, thanks so much for your time and response, one more quick one, please. Maybe it's a best practice to not clear the cache? Makes me wonder why it's not an option to clear the cache for single page/post, for changes made to only those, rather than clearing for the entire site.
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ChrystopherJ Premium Plus
You have to flush the entire cache, otherwise you will end up with inconsistencies, as a change to a page/post isn't always only to that single element. That post might appear in various blog rolls that also need to be updated, or on posts that contain related posts, or recent posts, etc. Each page/post also links to CSS/JS files that also get updated.
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JohnnyMark1 Premium Plus
I understand, thank you!
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AbieAJ Premium Plus
Open to discussion. Thanks for the share.
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JohnnyMark1 Premium Plus
Hello, I was poking around and discovered for myself that it's now possible to switch editors on the fly. Go to: Settings --> Writing
This is something new to me, I don't believe was available before. This option must be available when the Classic Editor plugin is active.
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ChrystopherJ Premium Plus
The following page links to some training about the Block Editor (Gutenberg), that includes how to set this value, how to revert changes and how to still use SiteContent etc. I will be adding more over the next few weeks.
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JohnnyMark1 Premium Plus
Hey, thanks a lot Chrystopher. I'll check it out.
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MarionBlack Premium
You must have missed my training video from about 3 years ago
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JohnnyMark1 Premium Plus
Yes, I did miss that, either that, or I forgot about it. I'll even forget about things I wrote myself, Ha ha! Thanks!
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MarionBlack Premium
I have to watch my own videos occasionally because I forget how to do stuff 😋
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LloydHarry1 Premium
Hi WA community I would like to say welcome to all the new Premium members. I hope you all have a great day, much success with your businesses.
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