The slug for this page contains stop words?

Last Update: October 24, 2018

Yoast tells me that the slug for this page contains stop words. What does this mean? Why or how does this make a difference and what do I do to remove them?

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DavePaton Premium
Does the slug refer to the url?
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cramervod Premium
try watching this to see it done. You will also have the option to edit your permalink before publishing through site content.
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DavePaton Premium
He says to do it as a draft but I have a heap of posts i need to do this on that are published.
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DavePaton Premium
What should i do with them?
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cramervod Premium
Don't worry about that, it's just something to do from now on that helps you keep things neat for Google. Lot's of posts get ranked well either way. This is just one other thing you can do to squeak some extra ranking juice outta your post. It's not essential to do it.
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MarionBlack Premium
Zsolt and Eric have given you the meaning of the term "stop words".

Yoast is suggesting that you remove the unnecessary words from your URL (slug/permalink) to keep the URL shorter. Don't remove stop words from your title or your article as you are writing for people, not search engines.

You can edit the slug by just deleting the words you don't want to appear in it. There's an Edit button next to the Permalink.
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smartketeer Premium
Hi David,

In computer search engines, a stop word is a commonly used word (such as "the") that a search engine has been programmed to ignore, both when indexing entries for searching and when retrieving them as the result of a search query.

When building the index, most engines are programmed to remove certain words from any index entry. The list of words that are not to be added is called a stop list. Stop words are deemed irrelevant for searching purposes because they occur frequently in the language for which the indexing engine has been tuned.

In order to save both space and time, these words are dropped at indexing time and then ignored at search time. Some search engines allow you to include a stop word in your search by putting an inclusion (plus sign) before each stop word in your query.

The point: for the above reasons the stop words won't be considered and indexed.

And Eric below gave you a long list ...
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cramervod Premium
here is a list of stop words:

"a", "about", "above", "after", "again", "against", "all", "am", "an", "and", "any", "are", "as", "at", "be", "because", "been", "before", "being", "below", "between", "both", "but", "by", "could", "did", "do", "does", "doing", "down", "during", "each", "few", "for", "from", "further", "had", "has", "have", "having", "he", "he'd", "he'll", "he's", "her", "here", "here's", "hers", "herself", "him", "himself", "his", "how", "how's", "i", "i'd", "i'll", "i'm", "i've", "if", "in", "into", "is", "it", "it's", "its", "itself", "let's", "me", "more", "most", "my", "myself", "nor", "of", "on", "once", "only", "or", "other", "ought", "our", "ours", "ourselves", "out", "over", "own", "same", "she", "she'd", "she'll", "she's", "should", "so", "some", "such", "than", "that", "that's", "the", "their", "theirs", "them", "themselves", "then", "there", "there's", "these", "they", "they'd", "they'll", "they're", "they've", "this", "those", "through", "to", "too", "under", "until", "up", "very", "was", "we", "we'd", "we'll", "we're", "we've", "were", "what", "what's", "when", "when's", "where", "where's", "which", "while", "who", "who's", "whom", "why", "why's", "with", "would", "you", "you'd", "you'll", "you're", "you've", "your", "yours", "yourself", "yourselves" ];
};

To remove them you would just write the sentence without those in there. Or saying it another way you would keep only the most valuable keywords.

Eric
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