When creating blogs, can we add facts, comments, research or statistics to give our blogs more authority related to the subject.
I am not talking about copying whole articles, but adding bits of information to a blog I have written in my words.
I am sure most of us don't have the time or resources to do research for every little piece if information we use other than the research we do on line.
Example: Like doing a blog on different diets. I assumed we can gather information on the different types of diets and use them in a blog as long as we are not just copying and pasting and not really doing our own writing. johnny
I am not talking about copying whole articles, but adding bits of information to a blog I have written in my words.
I am sure most of us don't have the time or resources to do research for every little piece if information we use other than the research we do on line.
Example: Like doing a blog on different diets. I assumed we can gather information on the different types of diets and use them in a blog as long as we are not just copying and pasting and not really doing our own writing. johnny

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Armlemt Premium
Not only can you take the facts and research that you do and add them to your blog posts, it is a great way to build your authority and brand. Most of my articles include research and research studies. Doing the research does slow down how often I post, but it goes to credibility. (My site is on migraines.)

There is research coming out on everything just about every day. To shorten your search time online, you should sign up for Google Alerts. This way the articles and research that is most current comes to your mailbox when it comes out. This training will show you how to set them up. You can set up as many search terms as you would like. I have two set up. I started with four, but I was getting a lot of duplication, so I cut it back to two.

Best Wishes,

Anita
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techhound Premium
You have to remember two aspects of content creation - what separates your blog from others? And, what kind of value are you offering your reader?

Both of these aspects require finding information about your topic that readers wouldn't take the time to do. For instance, if your writing is based completely around a common search you did in Google, wouldn't your readers be capable of finding that information themselves? If yes, then you didn't separate yourself from others and didn't offer much of value to your readers.

Having said this, there is nothing wrong with linking small snippets or references to other people's work. That is the foundation of the web. That's where the Hypertext in HTML comes from. Before the web become mainstream, students at universities were using it to share information and research. Supporting information from other websites is a standard technique in research. Just make sure you don't go overboard and credit the work, always.

Hope this helps,
Jim
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marytegavota Premium
Writing good content requires research. If you are collecting information from other sites, you must quote sources or run the risk of plagiarism and losing your website.

Cheers

Mary
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ShuiHyen Premium
Hey,

You’re right, most of us don’t have enough time for research and writing the whole article. But we have to do it in an ethical way. I have wrote a post about “Best Practice Tips for Content Curation Strategy”

https://zpothub.com/best-practices-for-content-curation-strategy/
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johnnyfaulk1 Premium
thank you very helpful
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IvyT Premium
How do people know that you are an authority on your topic? Why should they trust you?

Yes, you should prove what you say by providing the references to back it up. You should make the time to research what's the latest in your niche, and demonstrate that you have. Otherwise you're not going to be trusted as an authority.

I earn a living as a writer-researcher, and my writing is worthless without that research effort. It's part of the professional writing process, no matter what your genre of writing.

Please don't think of research as some annoying add-on thing that takes time from your writing. It is what underpins your writing. And it's hot-exciting enjoyable to make discoveries while researching your topics! There are days it feels like accidentally discovering pirate treasure. Don't deny yourself this part of the writer's life.

Another thing to consider: Google values and ranks your writing more highly if:

1. Your writing is original
2. You are referencing many sources, and not just one
3. You include many outbound links to these sources
4. These outbound links go to quality, authoritative sites

Hey, here's a story a friend told me recently. It kind of fits in here:

He was on a plane, traveling from Australia to the US to present at a conference. He made friends with the guy sitting next to him, who had a fabulous job: he was the personal research assistant of one of the greatest living novelists.

So, this personal research assistant described how his boss sent him on trips around the world to peer at antique village registries, or report from foreign farming almanacs and collect information on the type of flower that was blooming in a field at a certain time of the year. His boss' authority, even as a distinguished writer of fiction, needed quality research to underpin it.

Why wouldn't you make the same effort for your own reputation and market worth?

TL;DR : if you 'add little pieces of information from others' - you must give credit. Your ranking and reputation is improved by it. Failure to do so penalises your site. Why let that happen after so much hard work?
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